Whooping Cranes, Ultralight Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Joe Duff, Endangered species, Endangered species, Whooping cranes, Whooping cranes, Sandhill cranes, Canada geese goose, Migration, Fathergoose, Reintroduction, Ultralight Flying, Jeff Daniels, Birds
Capture Myopathy -

Despite their large size, all species of cranes are susceptible to Capture Myopathy. Each time they must be handled for banding, or physical examinations we run the risk of subjecting them to stress/capture myopathy. This is why the cranes are hooded during each handling procedure, as it reduces the stress level.

Capture myopathy, also called exertional myopathy, is a condition that is characterized by damage to the muscles from an increased myocyte production of lactic acid when oxygen is depleted and anaerobic metabolism occurs.

Clinical signs include ataxia, pareses, and paralysis. Myopathy is indicated by elevated serum creatine kinase (CK) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) enzyme levels and loss of muscle function.
(Spraker, 1993; Fowlers, 1995; Williams and Thorne, 1996).

Home | Our Work | Get Involved | In the Field
Merchandise | Links | Contact Us