Two Pairs of Whooping Cranes at the Marsh

This season the CraneCam has allowed us glimpses into the wildlife at White River Marsh Wildlife Area. After awhile, if you have a curious streak, you get to know the schedules of the marsh inhabitants.

Both 4-12 and 5-12 – male Whooping cranes, seem to have established territories at the marsh and are seen frequently. When they were young and foolish they traveled together. Now, however, they each has lady Whooper friends.

4-12 paired with female 3-14 in the spring of 2015 and were quickly dubbed ‘the Royal Couple’ by viewers and recently, 5-12 courted 8-14.

The Royal Couple is pretty predictable with their schedule: Each evening between 7:45 and 8:15 they fly in from the north end of the marsh after a day spent foraging and settle to roost on the White River. Then in the mornings, they typically fly out of their roost location between 6:25 and 6:35.

5-12 and 8-14 haven’t established a pattern just yet – or if they have, we’ve been so busy watching the comings and goings of the Royal Couple that we’ve not yet clued in. Last night, however, while watching the Royal Couple, viewers were treated to the new couple flying in to roost along the river. Take a look!

(Thanks to Zoomie Rich Smith for his quick response on the pan/zoom buttons!)

 

REGISTER now!

Registration is now open for this year’s festival!

AND for a limited time, a very generous supporter has offered to make a $100 donation to Operation Migration for each and every registration we receive between now and September 8th (to a total of $4000.00)!!!

Still $600 left in this incredible offer

The Whooping crane festival takes place the second weekend in September. This year’s activities get underway Thursday, Sept. 8th at 6pm with a meet and greet at the Goose Blind in Green Lake. Come on out and join everyone for an evening of fun activities.

Friday morning take in a tour at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin then join us at the American Legion in Princeton at 6pm for our Festival kick-off dinner!

Saturday, Sept. 10th brings the all day FREE festival for all ages at the Princeton School. Kids can take part in one of the interactive and informative sessions with David Stokes – the snake, turtle, frog man. Kids can also build their own birdhouse, have their face painted or take part in some of the other fun activities. Register Now

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

Be sure to check out the MASSIVE origami crane in the main gymnasium. The crane will be folded by the students of the Princeton School under supervision of Mako Pellerin. It is expected to have a wingspan of more than 30 feet and will be on display on the stage inside the gymnasium!

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

We have a fabulous speakers line-up this year so check it out and make plans to attend one or all of the sessions throughout the day.

Arrive early and take part in the pancake breakfast put on by the Princeton School students. The hotcakes start flipping on the griddle at 8am!

Stay for lunch and enjoy many local food offerings, including brats, cheesecake and many other favorites. Place bids on the many silent auction items lining the school hallways! (Winning bids will be announced at 2:30pm) Register Now!

The Vendors Marketplace will open at 8am and we currently have twenty vendors and artisans lined-up. If you’re a vendor and would like to reserve a booth, please email: cranefestival@operationmigration.org

This is a great opportunity to start your holiday shopping or to find some really neat bird related items! As you can see Saturday’s Festival has something for everyone!

Saturday evening we’ll see a Crane Trivia re-match! The VFW Lodge in Princeton will be the place for this epic brain battle. Will team OMG hold the title for another year? Beforehand, we’ll relax and enjoy pizza and pasta from Christiano’s. Be sure to pre-register for this as space is limited.

Sunday is a day to unwind and relax with an early morning walk in the marsh with leaders Tom Schultz and Joe Duff. Again, space is limited so be sure to pre-register. Psst, a special treat will be served up in the blind!

Choose one of three available voyageur canoe trips along the Fox River. This hand-built craft is a replica of the French fur trader craft used along the historic water routes that supported settlement of much of Wisconsin. Trips start at 10, noon and 2 pm and last just over an hour. While the canoe holds up to 14 paddlers, it is recommended you pre-register to reserve your seat.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

CHECK out all the events taking place in and around beautiful Princeton, Wisconsin during the Whooping Crane Festival – September 8 – 11, 2016

Register Now and OM will receive a contribution of $100 for your registration as well as every other registration that comes in before September 8th.

Congratulations Hailey!

The Princeton Whooping Crane Festival Committee reached out to teacher Corrie Mussell when they needed a design for a T-shirt, which will raise awareness for Whooping crane conservation.

One of the elements we’ll be featuring at the upcoming Crane Festival is a HUGE origami crane. Now when I say ‘HUGE’ I don’t mean bigger than your average folded origami crane that you can hold in the palm of your hand.

I mean HUGE!

When the students at the Princeton school and Mako Pellerin finish folding this origami masterpiece – it will feature a wingspan of more than 30 feet!

So, it’s only fitting that this large paper crane has a T-shirt dedicated to it. Enter 17 summer school art students and teacher Corrie Mussell. The students submitted designs for the T-shirt, which will be given to the students & teachers involved in constructing the origami crane. (There will be no additional shirts for sale).

T-shirtThe design chosen by the committee was created by Hailey Treder. Hailey will receive a gift bag including a shirt, mug, and $50 chamber gift certificate, redeemable at any Princeton, WI retailer.

Thanks to Doug & Mako Pellerin who are donating the shirts to the students helping to create the HUGE origami crane, which will be unveiled at the Whooping Crane Festival Sept. 10th at the Princeton School.

Corrie Mussell's Summer Art Class Students: Back row, left to right: Hunter, Madeline, Katelyn, Sarabeth, Darla, Kaylee, Hannah, James. Front row, left to right: Evin, Kaitlyn, Brady, Alyssa, Sophia, Hailey, Kendra, Grace. not pictured: Frankie

Corrie Mussell’s Summer Art Class Students: Back row, left to right: Hunter, Madeline, Katelyn, Sarabeth, Darla, Kaylee, Hannah, James.  Front row, left to right: Evin, Kaitlyn, Brady, Alyssa, Sophia, Hailey, Kendra, Grace. Not pictured: Frankie

All the artwork is currently on display in Princeton in the Fox Notes storefront window. Congratulations you budding artists! Bravo!

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Hailey’s winning submission is on the left.

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As you can see, the committee had a difficult time selecting just one T-shirt design.

We hope you can join us at this year’s FESTIVAL Sept. 8 – 11

 

Tracking Technology

Bird banders have been banding birds for a long time. Capturing songbirds in mist nets, they carefully measure and weigh the tiny flyer to determine overall health and then very carefully affix a numbered band to its leg and release it.

The information gathered from the bird is sent, along with the band information, to the Bird Banding Lab or BBL – a division of the United States Geological Survey.

It used to be this was the only way to ‘track’ songbirds on their twice annual journeys. Capture the same bird again and you would know by the band it was wearing who, what, where and when banded it.

Now with some pretty incredible technological advancements – researchers can track in real time, migration flights as birds travel the globe. What they’re finding out and some pretty dramatic adventures.

READ the full story

15 Days Left…

We’re raffling off this one-of-a-kind stained glass Whooping crane panel. This piece was created by yours truly and donated to Operation Migration to help raise awareness for Whooping cranes and funds for our work this year.

Tickets will be available online through end of day August 31st. Thereafter, tickets will be available at the Whooping Crane Festival in Princeton, Wisconsin.

Only 15 days left to get your tickets online!

Winning ticket will be drawn at the close of the Whooping Crane Festival on Saturday, September 10th.

Winner will be notified in person (if in attendance), by telephone, or by email.

Shipping costs (if necessary) will be assumed by Operation Migration.

Here’s a photo of the panel:

With frame measures 41 inches high x 30 inches wide

With frame measures 41 inches high x 30 inches wide

Get your tickets now…

REGISTER Now!

Registration is now open for this year’s festival!

AND for a limited time, a very generous supporter has offered to make a $100 donation to Operation Migration for each and every registration we receive between now and September 8th (to a total of $4000.00)!!!

UPDATE: Twenty persons have taken advantage of this very generous offer. This created $2000 in support for OM and means there is still an additional $2000 available!

The Whooping crane festival takes place the second weekend in September. This year’s activities get underway Thursday, Sept. 8th at 6pm with a meet and greet at the Goose Blind in Green Lake. Come on out and join everyone for an evening of fun activities.

Friday morning take in a tour at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin then join us at the American Legion in Princeton at 6pm for our Festival kick-off dinner!

Saturday, Sept. 10th brings the all day FREE festival for all ages at the Princeton School. Kids can take part in one of the interactive and informative sessions with David Stokes – the snake, turtle, frog man. Kids can also build their own birdhouse, have their face painted or take part in some of the other fun activities. Register Now

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

Be sure to check out the MASSIVE origami crane in the main gymnasium. The crane will be folded by the students of the Princeton School under supervision of Mako Pellerin. It is expected to have a wingspan of more than 30 feet and will be on display on the stage inside the gymnasium!

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

We have a fabulous speakers line-up this year so check it out and make plans to attend one or all of the sessions throughout the day.

Arrive early and take part in the pancake breakfast put on by the Princeton School students. The hotcakes start flipping on the griddle at 8am!

Stay for lunch and enjoy many local food offerings, including brats, cheesecake and many other favorites. Place bids on the many silent auction items lining the school hallways! (Winning bids will be announced at 2:30pm) Register Now!

The Vendors Marketplace will open at 8am and we currently have twenty vendors and artisans lined-up. If you’re a vendor and would like to reserve a booth, please email: cranefestival@operationmigration.org

This is a great opportunity to start your holiday shopping or to find some really neat bird related items! As you can see Saturday’s Festival has something for everyone!

Saturday evening we’ll see a Crane Trivia re-match! The VFW Lodge in Princeton will be the place for this epic brain battle. Will team OMG hold the title for another year? Beforehand, we’ll relax and enjoy pizza and pasta from Christiano’s. Be sure to pre-register for this as space is limited.

Sunday is a day to unwind and relax with an early morning walk in the marsh with leaders Tom Schultz and Joe Duff. Again, space is limited so be sure to pre-register. Psst, a special treat will be served up in the blind!

Choose one of three available voyageur canoe trips along the Fox River. This hand-built craft is a replica of the French fur trader craft used along the historic water routes that supported settlement of much of Wisconsin. Trips start at 10, noon and 2 pm and last just over an hour. While the canoe holds up to 14 paddlers, it is recommended you pre-register to reserve your seat.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

CHECK out all the events taking place in and around beautiful Princeton, Wisconsin during the Whooping Crane Festival – September 8 – 11, 2016

Register Now and OM will receive a contribution of $100 for your registration as well as every other registration that comes in before September 8th.

Why Walk When you Can Fly?

Watching the CraneCam over the past 10 years has allowed us and viewers a viewing window into the daily goings on of many species and one of the things that always strikes me is the amount of walking cranes do.

They walk mile after mile each and every day and I’ve often thought of slipping my fitbit step tracker onto a crane just to count some of the steps I miss each day sitting at my desk.

I’ve often wondered why they would spend so much time on the ground when they have these beautiful wings that could carry them anywhere they wanted to go… If I had wings, I wouldn’t spend that much time walking (or worrying about the steps on my fitbit).

Take a look at the video clip that Doug Pellerin recently captured for us and you’ll find the answer to why they walk (and walk and walk).

If they flew everywhere they wanted to go – they’d probably never eat. Look at the number of times they stop to pick up a tasty insect in this short clip.

Oh, and the pair in the video? That’s male #5-12 & female #8-14 (YAY!)

Tap Dancing in the Field (Journal)

As OM’s Chief Financial Officer (CFO) I usually don’t perform the kind of work that makes for exciting reading, yet I’m obligated to contribute to the Field Journal at least once in a while. This week, while Heather is on a much-needed vacation, once in a while is more frequent than usual because we like to post something new at least once each day. Heather pre-scheduled several posts before she left (thank you!), but that still left me with 3 days to fill.

I suppose I could write about state charity registrations. See? You’re yawning already! Many states require non-profits to register (and often pay a fee) annually in order to legally raise funds in their state. Since we raise funds through an online presence (our website), donors could live in any state (and any country, for that matter). Our US accountant helps me sort all this out by advising as to which states we need to address, and by filling out the more complex forms (some are as bad as the IRS 1040 long form!). I handle the the less complicated forms, printing and assembly, and the mailing. Because of all the supporting documentation that must accompany most renewals, we’re talking about packets in the range of 50-80 pages each. That’s a lot of printing because very few states offer online renewals!

Why am I talking about this? Well, for one reason, I’m “tap dancing” my way through a Field Journal entry – I have to write about something, don’t I? The other reason is that state registration renewals are what I’ve mostly been working on for the past 2 weeks – about 15 states are due on August 15th. I’m happy to report that they have all been filed, even the ones that required notarized signatures and the ones that required multiple signatures – those I had to ship off to one of our Board Directors along with pre-paid envelopes so he could, in turn, mail them to the appropriate states. Not sure if I should mention that the first set I sent to him I had forgotten to have pre-paid postage put on 5 of the envelopes. So sorry Doug, and thank you for turning them around promptly – your postage reimbursement check is in the mail!

Well, I think I’ve bored you enough with this back-office stuff, so I’ll leave you with something about Whooping Cranes. Recently I was honored to have been interviewed by a reporter at one of our local “feel-good” newspapers. You can read the resulting article HERE!

Me and a Whooping Crane on the 2015 Migration

Me and a Whooping Crane on the 2015 Migration

In Case You Missed These Items

Many of you already purchased your OM 15 Years Commemorative tee-shirt, but just in case you didn’t, we have a few left. Shop for them HERE on our website.

15 Year Commemorative T Shirt

15 Year Commemorative T Shirt

We also got in a new order of last year’s popular Whooping Crane socks, designed by our own Heather Ray (who insists she’s NOT a designer). Click HERE for socks!

Whooping Crane Socks

And, in case you just want to browse our merchandise, here’s the whole STORE.

Our Dangerous Conservation Crisis

At the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Presidential campaign forum, held in June in Colorado, Dan Ashe gave a speech that pointed out that unless hunters and fishermen conscientiously work to get new people involved in our pursuits, fish and wildlife will soon become irrelevant to America. 

A portion of his speech is below, along with a link to it’s entirety published in Field & Stream.

Dan-Ashe

We are at a make-or-break juncture for wildlife conservation. It’s time for leaders to lead.

I’ve presented versions of these thoughts in several venues, including a keynote address at this year’s North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Management Conference, and the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership Media Summit. I’m told that the standing ovation from the 1300-plus attendees at the North American was either unprecedented, or, at least, the only one that anyone could remember. People came up throughout and after the conference and said some variety of, “Thank you! That needed to be said.” I’ve received dozens of emails, like this one, from a sportsman and long-tenured leader in the conservation community:

“… just read your referenced remarks out in Colorado [at TRCP Media Summit]. Great insight from a tremendous depth of experience, foresight and vision—bravo and kudos for articulating the message all aspects of the conservation community needs to hear and embrace!”

Honestly, I didn’t and don’t think they’re that revolutionary, but in retrospect, perhaps they’re revealing in the same way that Toto revealed the true nature, vulnerability, and fraudulence of the Wizard of Oz, by simply pulling back a curtain.

The curtain I’ve apparently pulled back has three pieces:

First, and briefly, the nature of the challenge that we face today, and will increasingly face tomorrow.

Second, a growing and disabling dysfunction in the conservation community.

Third, a specific and tragic symptom of that dysfunction—the growing irrelevance of conservation.

READ more at Field & Stream

Step Into the Chatters’ Box

If you don’t watch our CraneCam, you really should. It’s a webcam mounted on a 30’ish foot mast located in the White River Marsh State Wildlife Area in Princeton, Wisconsin. Volunteer camera operators use the pan/tilt/zoom features to look around the marsh for any and all critters, and especially for Whooping Cranes. The zoom is amazing – we sometimes find cranes that hang out near a farm that is 2 miles away from the camera!

You can open our CraneCam and simply watch, but you’ll also want to turn on your computer’s speakers so you hear the soothing sounds of the marsh – song birds and cranes. Sometimes you have to lower the volume because, wow, does it get windy there! If you just watch the CraneCam and don’t chat, we refer to you as “lurkers”. That’s OK – lurk away! But if you don’t join the chat you’re really missing out on all the fun we have. I was going to add that you’re missing out on the information we share, but, fortunately, you can see that even if you don’t participate.

Some of the information is educational – obviously we chat about Whooping Cranes! And we LOVE to answer questions so we’re thrilled when a newbie joins and wants to know what’s going on and what in the world we’re looking at. When a newbie stays around and becomes a Craniac, well, that’s (in RI-ese) wicked awesome!

I have to admit, though, that sometimes our inner children take over our keyboards and chat gets just plain silly. We have so much fun discussing ANYTHING that comes up (except religion and politics, of course). We have a virtual “naughty couch” where chatters are virtually sent if, in just about anyone’s opinion, they deserve it. Often it’s because they used a four-letter word like “work” or “snow”. The problem with the naughty couch as punishment is that everyone wants to go there to virtually dig under the virtual cushions to find the virtual M&M’s that someone might have virtually left there. Other people virtually jump up and down on the couch. This year, Heather had to virtually send the naughty couch out for a virtual cleaning because it got so dirty from virtual overuse.

Another piece of silliness that generates a few chuckles (or LOLs) involves the camera operators (“drivers”) hiding the keys to the cam controls in hard-to-reach places. Of course there ARE no real keys to the camera – it’s just more virtual fun – but we try to be very creative. The keys have been left on cloud 9, given to Fred and Ginger (Sandhill Cranes) who just flew off, hung on a branch on the green tree (do you know how many green trees there are???), hung on a turkey’s beak, buried in a gold box under the picnic tree, and gotten all messy and moldy from cream cheese that a previous driver was virtually eating.

Chatters seem to name everything. I already mentioned Fred and Ginger and the picnic tree. We also have Cat’s tree, the wee tree, the harrier bush, the boom-boom bushes, and more recently we have Genny and Beany – these are the generator (for the cam) and the gas container that sit near the runway inviting every newbie to ask “what are those red things?”. We also have the PPG (pretty peaceful glade) and, of course, the Royal Couple (#’s 4-12 and 3-14).

Sometimes chatters will show up with virtual food to pass around, and there’s no shortage of virtual coffee in the morning. Ahhhh mornings – we see the most GORGEOUS sunrises on the CraneCam! Then, shortly after sunrise, the roosting sandies fly out to forage for the day while cam drivers try to follow their flight paths and hope they will catch some “white birds” in flight. White bird (WB) is what we call a whooper older than 1 year because by then they have lost all their cinnamon feathers and are just that – white birds.

Oh! Another virtual food option while you’re chatting is The Blind Café. Two chatters (Margie and Id) have virtually converted the blind into a restaurant that serves the BEST virtual breakfasts!

OK, so it all sounds silly, but honestly, even though most of us have never met face-to-face, we have become great friends because of what we have in common – a love of nature, fun, and, most of all, Whooping Cranes.

Oops! Gotta go – a turkey parade is heading under the picnic tree and I don’t wanna miss it!

Please Don’t Paint the Turtles

While that seems like a no-brainer for most, apparently some people do need to be told not to do this…

It seems that painting live turtles and tortoises have become something of a fad in Florida, and officials are now making a stern warning to leave the animals alone. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) made a statement last week urging residents to refrain from applying paint on wildlife—something that to most people, should be common sense.

READ more.

painted-turtle

5-12 Got his Groove Back!

Now let’s all hope he keeps it…

As loyal followers will know, this 4 yr old male hasn’t had the best of luck with the ladies. Last week Doug Pellerin and I did a quiet little happy dance in the rain when we detected radio signals from both 5-12 and female 8-14 in the same small area. It has been rather difficult to get eyes on her since she arrived at the marsh in late May.

Then he (5-12 not Doug) would be on his own in his usual field the next day… ‘Stinker” said Doug… ‘Maybe he’s taking it slow’ I said ‘courting her – not wanting to rush things.’

A couple of nights over the past week, PTT hits for the 2 yr old female Whooper indicated she roosted in the area just west of her former pensite at White River Marsh – in the same area that male 5-12 roosted in earlier this summer before he switched things up and moved to the north end of the marsh (only to be chased off by 4-12 & 3-14).

I was hopeful but didn’t want to jinx things so I kept the roosting news to myself until we could confirm things. Last Thursday morning, Doug headed over to the marsh and texted me that he had a signal on 5-12 in his usual foraging field west of the pensite. ‘Check for 8-14’! I responded…

“She’s with him” replied Doug – and so we did another happy dance: Doug in Green Lake County, Wisconsin and me at my desk in Ontario.

I promised Doug a dozen apple cider donuts if he could get a photo. Anyone that knows Doug, knows he LOVES apple cider donuts – available only in the fall. Looks like I owe him TWO dozen for the two great photos he captured!

DSC_5131

Male Whooping crane 5-12 on the left and female 8-14 on right. Photo: Doug Pellerin

 

Let's hope this duo becomes a bonded pair. Photo: Doug Pellerin

Let’s hope this duo becomes a bonded pair. Photo: Doug Pellerin

Whooping Crane Festival FAST Approaching!

Registration is now open for this year’s festival!

AND for a limited time, a very generous supporter has offered to make a $100 donation to Operation Migration for each and every registration we receive between now and September 8th (to a total of $4000.00)!!!

The Whooping crane festival takes place the second weekend in September. This year’s activities get underway Thursday, Sept. 8th at 6pm with a meet and greet at the Goose Blind in Green Lake. Come on out and join everyone for an evening of fun activities.

Friday morning take in a tour at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin then join us at the American Legion in Princeton at 6pm for our Festival kick-off dinner!

Saturday, Sept. 10th brings the all day FREE festival for all ages at the Princeton School. Kids can take part in one of the interactive and informative sessions with David Stokes – the snake, turtle, frog man. Kids can also build their own birdhouse, have their face painted or take part in some of the other fun activities. Register Now

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

David Stokes is entertaining for children AND adults!

Be sure to check out the MASSIVE origami crane in the main gymnasium. The crane will be folded by the students of the Princeton School under supervision of Mako Pellerin. It is expected to have a wingspan of more than 30 feet and will be on display on the stage inside the gymnasium!

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

Mako provided this artists depiction for the massive origami crane she and the students will be making at the festival.

We have a fabulous speakers line-up this year so check it out and make plans to attend one or all of the sessions throughout the day.

Arrive early and take part in the pancake breakfast put on by the Princeton School students. The hotcakes start flipping on the griddle at 8am!

Stay for lunch and enjoy many local food offerings, including brats, cheesecake and many other favorites. Place bids on the many silent auction items lining the school hallways! (Winning bids will be announced at 2:30pm) Register Now!

The Vendors Marketplace will open at 8am and we currently have twenty vendors and artisans lined-up. If you’re a vendor and would like to reserve a booth, please email: cranefestival@operationmigration.org

This is a great opportunity to start your holiday shopping or to find some really neat bird related items! As you can see Saturday’s Festival has something for everyone!

Saturday evening we’ll see a Crane Trivia re-match! The VFW Lodge in Princeton will be the place for this epic brain battle. Will team OMG hold the title for another year? Beforehand, we’ll relax and enjoy pizza and pasta from Christiano’s. Be sure to pre-register for this as space is limited.

Sunday is a day to unwind and relax with an early morning walk in the marsh with leaders Tom Schultz and Joe Duff. Again, space is limited so be sure to pre-register. Psst, a special treat will be served up in the blind!

Choose one of three available voyageur canoe trips along the Fox River. This hand-built craft is a replica of the French fur trader craft used along the historic water routes that supported settlement of much of Wisconsin. Trips start at 10, noon and 2 pm and last just over an hour. While the canoe holds up to 14 paddlers, it is recommended you pre-register to reserve your seat.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

Be sure to reserve your seat on one of three available trips: 10 am, noon and 2 pm.

CHECK out all the events taking place in and around beautiful Princeton, Wisconsin during the Whooping Crane Festival – September 8 – 11, 2016

Register Now and OM will receive a contribution of $100 for your registration as well as every other registration that comes in before September 8th.

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