TAKING GOOD CARE

Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary defines Animal Welfare as, “the avoidance of abuse and exploitation of animals by humans by maintaining appropriate standards of accommodation, feeding and general care, the prevention and treatment of disease, and the assurance of freedom from harassment, and unnecessary discomfort and pain.”

Anytime we have or bring animals into captivity, whether we through birth/hatch or capture, we are obligated to protect those animals’ welfare. I believe there are no two ways about it. By controlling the its actions and choices, we must assume full responsibility for that animal.

In the case of the Whooping Cranes in the Eastern Migratory Population, WCEP and its partners assume full responsibility for their well being the minute we are in possession of a fertile egg. From a welfare standpoint, there are pages upon pages of protocols for everything involved in raising these birds.

Every step of the way attention is given to the most minute detail. These include everything from weight management to regular exercise sessions, both swimming and walking to ensure proper development. The U.S.G.S. Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland is well known for success at producing healthy Whooping crane chicks.

But the attention to the young cranes’ welfare doesn’t end there. We continue to safeguard them throughout the entire time they are in our care. They are given de-worming medications according to a schedule provided by International Crane Foundation veterinarians. They have constant access to clean drinking water, are provided with a specially formulated diet, and follow a specific exercise schedule.

Sometimes weather will prevent training with the ultralights for several days in a row. When this happens, and assuming appropriate conditions, on the third day of no activity we let the cranes out of the pen to give them time to run around, stretch their wings, and forage. Additionally, we provide enrichment toys (pumpkins and corn) to keep the cohort entertained and curious. While we are responsible for them, the ultimate goal is to ensure they live a healthy, stress-free, disease-free, and harassment-free life.

Based on Saunders’ definition I believe we do everything we possibly can to ensure the cohorts’ welfare. Determining exactly what is appropriate for an animal’s welfare can be a difficult assignment, and yes, we do manipulate the young birds, but it is in order to achieve a broader goal.

We are in control of directing and caring for the cranes until they have reached a point they can be released into the wild. The very fact that so many young cranes have been successfully released into the wild for so many years with so few incidents, lends credence to the efficacy of the entire process.

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