It’s TWINS x 3!

Yes! you read that right – we currently have THREE sets of twins in the core reintroduction area of Wisconsin!

Wisconsin DNR’s Beverly Paulan performed an aerial survey yesterday and reported the first set of twins belong to 5-10* & 28-08. (click on each photo to enlarge)

Mom 5-10 (or Dad 28-08) tending to TWO newly hatched Whooping crane chicks

Mom 5-10 (or Dad 28-08) tending to TWO newly hatched Whooping crane chicks. Photo: Bev Paulan, WI DNR

Next on the roster is W3-10* with mate 29-08 with their two young offspring. Note: this would be second generation wild produced Whooping cranes, since Mom (W3-10) is a wild produced Whooping crane.

Both parents providing for their two offspring. Photo: Bev Paulan, WI DNR

Both parents providing for their two offspring. Photo: Bev Paulan, WI DNR

Not to be outdone is Mom 25-09* and mate 2-04 with their set of twins.

Not to be outdone is Mom 25-09* and mate 2-04 with their set of twins. Photo: Bev Paulan, WI DNR

Also observed during the survey was 11 & 15-09* and their new chick W2-15, Adults 17-07* & 10-09 with their chick W3-15.

Pictured below is 18-03 & 36-09 provisioning their chick number W5-15. Look very closely…

More often than not, chicks aren't visible until photos are downloaded and scoured over. Bev noted this photo as 'Where's Waldo'?

More often than not, chicks aren’t visible until photos are downloaded and scoured over. Bev noted this photo as ‘Where’s Waldo’? Photo: Bev Paulan, WI DNR

To summarize, we’ve now had 11 wild produced crane chicks so far this season. Nine are currently surviving. Additionally, there are 14 pairs still incubating.

We should caution readers the chances a pair of Whooping cranes will successfully raise twins isn’t great. Still, we and I’m sure each of you, remain hopeful.

* following crane number denotes female

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18 Comments

  1. Harold Cutler May 22, 2015 9:25 pm

    Just curious and hope this is not a “dumb question”. Do you foresee a time when the Nacedeh Flock will be self sustaining? Or will you always need to introduce “a couple” of chicks from Paxtuxent to keep things expanding? Also It’s very possible that the Louisiana whoopers begin to interact with the Necedah flock??I also have to lobby for my homeland, Lake Champlain (full of fish, crustaceans and other goodies!), and the wilds of Maine as potential starting points for flocks:):):) (I’m not sure where the Southern dropoff points would be??)

    • Heather Ray May 24, 2015 7:40 am

      The goal is to create a self-sustaining population. It’s rather unlikely there will be any co-mingling with the Louisiana flock as they are non-migratory and the cranes from Wisconsin do not spend winters in LA.

  2. Hope Brogunier May 20, 2015 10:48 pm

    Exciting!!

  3. Cheryl Murphy May 20, 2015 9:18 pm

    Love your comment Dorothy Nordness! Balance is good!

    http://Harpistcherylmurphy

  4. Donna O’Keefe May 20, 2015 6:02 pm

    Two questions: Will any of the languishing twin chicks be rescued for raising in captivity, in order to assure rising population numbers? Why are some nests so close to water in which the chicks could drown?

    • Heather Ray May 21, 2015 5:32 am

      No attempt would be made to retrieve a young chick. That would be stressful for both parents and the offspring.
      Whooping cranes build nest platforms in water as a means of predator avoidance. If a land predator were to approach the parents would hear splashing as a warning. Young Whooping crane chicks, just like goslings, can swim.

  5. ffmn May 20, 2015 3:05 pm

    Awww, this news is so welcomed by evryone, to be sure!! I, too, hope the cranes have better success raising twins. What a great gift to wildlife that would be.

  6. Mindy May 20, 2015 12:07 pm

    Wonderful, hopeful news! Praying for all of them to be exceptionally equipped to provide for twins!

  7. birdlady9 May 20, 2015 12:04 pm

    How wonderful! This is what it’s all about. πŸ™‚

  8. Donald Huffman May 20, 2015 11:07 am

    Operation Migration et alia:

    If the cranes can produce enough to cover attrition for this past year that would be good news. Habitat, habitat, habitat.

  9. Grandma May 20, 2015 10:14 am

    This is so exciting and thanks to all that make this possible and keeping us informed. The photos are great!

  10. Dorothy Nordness May 20, 2015 10:09 am

    These 6 chicks are exactly what was needed to bring universe back into balance after the class of 2014 thoroughly tested the mettle of the staff getting them back to Wisconsin — the abandonment of the 5 youngsters by 5-12, the multitude of adventures crating the 5 wandering migrators, the mechanical breakdown of the practically brand-new (only 85,000 miles) truck. So now that the universe is back in balance, a great big WHOOP is in order!!!

  11. Margaret Maczulski May 20, 2015 9:58 am

    Truely wonderful and a great success! Wishes of a healthy life for all.

  12. Mollie Cook May 20, 2015 9:29 am

    SO EXCITING!!! Prayers for all the babies to survive. Go Whoopers!!

  13. Carl W. Sdano May 20, 2015 8:20 am

    Congratulations to the OM team! Promising results for the years of effort you’ve put in.

  14. Bobbie May 20, 2015 7:53 am

    WOW! Such wonderful news! Sending positive thoughts out to the Crane Parents that they may raise healthy youngsters to fledge πŸ™‚ Go Whooping Cranes!

  15. Patti May 20, 2015 6:19 am

    Well WHOOP x 6!!!! Congratulations to all of the pairs on their new families!!!! here’s hoping they all thrive and grow up strong and healthy!!!! πŸ™‚

  16. Libbyl May 20, 2015 6:14 am

    whoop! That is wonderful! Love that W3-10 has produced a live chick. Did 9-05 and his mate renest, after losing W1-15?
    Congratulations to the human “parents” !!