Whooping Crane Aerial Survey

Wisconsin DNR Pilot Bev Paulan flew a survey over Juneau and Adams County, WI yesterday and reports the three wild hatched chicks are still doing well. Two have been confirmed as fledged and the third very likely has as well but we’ve not been able to visually confirm.

The first photo below was taken by Jana Lood approximately a week ago from the public observation tower at Necedah NWR. Pictured are parents 9-03 & 3-04 with the youngest colt, W18-15.

Photo: Jana Lood

This is a wonderful opportunity for the public to visit the refuge to see this youngster! Photo: Jana Lood

Bev Paulan graciously provided the following images of the young Whooping crane colts captured during Wednesday’s flight. (Thanks Bev!)

Youngest hatch year wild Whooping crane colt W18-15 with parents 9-03 & 3-04. Photo: Bev Paulan

Youngest hatch year wild Whooping crane colt W18-15 with parents 9-03 & 3-04. Photo: Bev Paulan

The oldest Whooping crane colt this year, W3-15 hatched May 11 to parents 17-07 & 10-09. Here the chick is pictured with Dad 10-09 while Mom forages nearby. Photo: Bev Paulan

The oldest Whooping crane colt this year, W3-15 hatched May 11 to parents 17-07 & 10-09. Here the chick is pictured with Dad 10-09 while Mom forages nearby. Photo: Bev Paulan

115_2-04_25-09_W10

Watchful parents 25-09 & 2-04 with their offspring W10-15. Photo: Bev Paulan

In addition to the above cranes and colts, Bev noted fifty-three additional Whooping cranes in the core reintroduction area during her survey.

Share Button

7 Comments

  1. Kate Crook August 29, 2015 7:18 am

    Not only are the pictures newsworthy, they are perfectly beautiful photographs!

  2. Annelise jorgensen August 28, 2015 4:06 pm

    What joyous news!

    Thank you!-Thank you! Thank you!

  3. Kay Huey August 28, 2015 9:50 am

    Oh how wonderful! Not only are OM’s flocks reproducing, but they are successfully protecting their young charges. I hope for many more such images in the years to come. . . Thanks, Bev for showing us that the years of hard work from all concerned do work.

  4. Mollie Cook August 28, 2015 9:18 am

    Great news…………thanks Bev!

  5. Donald Huffman August 28, 2015 8:59 am

    Heather:

    Good. But we all want better reproduction. Have you followed the successful captive reared California condors? They have a number of pluses that the reintroduction of the whooping crane don’t have. Again its habitat, habitat, habitat. If they can get the lead out of firearm cartridges, they might be able to have more birds reintroduced than whooping cranes.

    • ryanwc September 12, 2015 5:11 pm

      Sure, but the prospects are brighter than you’re allowing for. There may be a different sort of success curve for crane parents because they have a more complex social structure and relatively more learned behaviors and socially triggered behaviors. So there could be a multiplier going forward. These pairs are much more likely to succeed in coming nesting seasons. Their success is a sign that other parents are likely to mature into successful parenting. And these 3 colts are likely to have picked up proper pair-bonding and parenting skills from their parents that the costume-raised birds had to sort out by trial and error. 3 fledged is actually a really big deal.

      But nobody can argue with “we want better reproduction.” We do!

  6. Bobbie August 28, 2015 8:21 am

    This is so amazing!