Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Fly Away Home, Operation Migration, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Bill Lishman, Joe Duff, Endangered species, Endangered species, Whooping cranes, Whooping cranes, Sandhill cranes, Canada geese goose, Migration, Fathergoose, Reintroduction, Ultralight Flying, Jeff Daniels, Birds


 
Bird Bio's - Class of '03

The Whooping cranes are numbered according to the order in which they hatched at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.  The first digit indicates the year in which they hatched, and the last two digits indicates the order in which they hatched. 

Example: crane #301 is the first hatch of 2003. Crane #311 was the eleventh chick hatched in the year 2003.

ID#
Photo
Personality Characteristics/Field Notes

301

  • Female
  • Hatched April 21st
  • Origin: San Antonio Zoo
  • Personality Characteristics: The oldest crane but one of the smallest. Very attentive and the best follower. Usually ran along near the right side of the trike during taxi-training. Might be the lowest-ranking female, but that may change when the whole flock gets combined and works out their pecking order.
  • First Migration South: Flew all but 33.1 miles with the ultraligh
  • History: First to attain her adult voice (Jan, 2004). Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). On Mar. 31 the group flew to Wilkes Cty., GA. April 1 they flew to Macon Cty., NC. April 2 and 3 brought poor weather and they stayed put until afternoon of April 3, when trouble arrived. The cranes were discovered and harassed by 5 humans who came right up to them. They flushed, and one crane hit a power line. Fortunately the bird was able to keep flying. The group circled for 1.5 hours before heading north, flying after darkness fell. Their location was unknown for the next two nights. The group of 8 was found in a farm field in southwestern Ohio after dark on April 5, thanks to the help of PTT readings and an airplane search. They flew on to west central Ohio on April 6. They stayed there again April 7, after taking off but returning again after #303 did not join them in flight, and again on April 8. On April 9 the group flew westward and separated south of Celina, Ohio. The group of five (301, 305, 309, 318, and 319) roosted in a marsh in southwest Michigan. The five departed April 10 under clear skies. After some lingering when they came to Lake Michigan, they turned south, following the shoreline of the lake for more than an hour before settling to roost in a large marsh in the southwest area of the state. April 11 they left, flew across the border to Indiana and then into Ohio and returned the same day to West-central Michigan, where they remained all winter on an unfamiliar side of Lake Michigan.
    Fall 2004: Cranes 301, 305, 309 and 318 began migration from Mason County, Michigan and moved south into Ohio on November 7. They appeared to be retracing their spring path until they detoured to South Carolina where #305 was killed, likely by a predator, on Nov. 13/14. Perhaps spooked by seeing the death of their flock mate, #301 together with #309 and #318 moved northward the next day to Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center in Georgetown County, South Carolina. After several short northward flights, the three began moving south. Were found inland in Jones County, NC on Nov. 20. They wintered in NC.
    Spring 2005:
    Departed Jones County, NC on migration March 30 with #309 and #318. Seen April 6 with #309 and #318 in western New York state, just across the Penn. border. They apparently followed the Lake Michigan lakeshore NE. The group had been reported in flight along the south shore of Lake Erie near Ripley, New York, on 6 April. This would mean they would have to somehow get around two of the Great Lakes to make it home. On April 15 the three were confirmed in Ontario, east of Lake Huron. They will most likely be returned to Wisconsin in an attempt to reorient them. With two of the Great Lakes separating them from the core introduction area, there is little likelihood they would make it back on their own. For now, they need to be in proximity to the rest of the population. The more opportunity they have to mingle, the greater the chance of proper mate selection and eventually breeding. A PTT reading indicated that #301 roosted in Algonquin Provincial Park near the Quebec border on the night of 16 April and then left the following morning. Low-quality readings for #301 on April 17-20 showed movement southbound to near the northern shore of Lake Ontario. The next reported sighting of #301 and 318 was on April 22 in a harvested cornfield on the southern shore of Georgian Bay. The two were still there on 25 April but the third crane, #309, has not been reported with them since 14 April. On April 27, #301 and #318 left Owen Sound and were seen near Tobermory (northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula, Ontario). Next confirmed in Chippewa Cty. on April 29. Then poor quality PTT readings in mid May indicate they had flown southward into the north-central Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Sure enough, #301 and #318 were finally confirmed by a citizen sighting 22 May in central Missaukee Co, MI. On the evening of June 30, #301 and #318 were successfully captured in Michigan by WCEP trackers. They were transported by aircraft to the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge and released. Both birds appear to be well. Hooray!
    Fall 2005: Began migration Nov. 17 with #311. They later joined in flight with #102 & #212, #203 & #317. The group roosted that night in Will County, IL. They flew Nov. 18 to SW of Indianapolis, Indiana. They were all still at this Marion County, IN stopover site in mid-December. On Dec. 20, a pair of whoopers that might have been #301/#311were sighted on Colleton County, SC. The pair arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site on Dec. 22.
    They remained in the pen area and made several short flights in the next few days.
    Spring 2006: Still in SC on March 23 but this bird (with #311??) may be one of the two reported back in Michigan April 2. This was the same general area occupied by#301 and #318 in 2004 and 2005 before the latter two birds were retrieved and re-released in Central Wisconsin early last summer (2005). SURPRISE! On April 6, #301 and #311 were found back on their territory at Wisconsins' Necedah NWR. They apparently flew over or around Lake Michigan to complete migration. On April 7 the pair was observed building a nest, but then they split up.
Banding:
W | G/R
302
  • Male
  • Hatched April 22nd
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: This large bird will likely be the biggest of the entire flock. He uses his size and is aggressive to the costume. He lost his "bustle" of feathers during shipping from Patuxent, but they will grow back. A good flyer and follower in training.
  • First Migration South: Turned back and landed at Necedah on day 1 of the migration along with 310, 311 and 313. While 303 was away recovering from surgery, this crane was reluctant to follow and appeared withdrawn socially. Turned back twice on Day 24 of the migration and was crated for transport. Total miles missed: 134.1
  • History: Attained his adult voice during the third week of March, 2004. Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes into 3 groups. Cranes #302, 307 and 311 --each now traveling solo--were located by radio signals April 9 in Georgia after after gaining about another 100 miles. On April 10, #302 left the roost in Upson County, Georgia. Signal next detected April 16, inflight south of Bloomington, Illinois. No signal detected for another 33 days, until May 19, 2004--28 miles from Necedah! May 20 he circled over Necedah NWR for an hour before landing for an hour. He flew off to a nearby county and joined #310 and #313 to roost in a cornfield.
    Fall 2004: Left Wisconsin October 23 with #317. Separated from #317 Oct. 24. Arrived a few days later in Iroquois County, IL. Stayed there till Dec. 12. (He was alone, and the landowner was convinced that this crane likes the Canada goose decoys that are sharing his wetland.) Next located with #310 and #313 during an aerial survey by Lara Fondow on January 18 in a managed wetland in Colleton County, South Carolina.
    Spring 2005:
    Began migration March 20 together with #310 and #313. On April 3, #302 was seen flying west of Chicago. On April 4 he arrived at Necedah NWR. He and #313 were together all summer.
    Fall 2005: Began migration with #209 on Nov. 17. Eventually joined #101, #202, and #208 to roost that night in Will County, IL. On Nov. 18 they moved to Lake County, Indiana. On Nov. 24, cranes #209 and #302 foraged in local wetlands and stayed around for the rest of the week. He and #209 apparently arrived on Dec. 5 at the same site occupied by #213 and #218 in Franklin County, Tennessee, where they were still present at the end of December. Spring 2006: Began migration with #209 on Nov. 17. Eventually joined #101, #202, and #208 to roost that night in Will County, IL. On Nov. 18 they moved to Lake County, Indiana. On Nov. 24, cranes #209 and #302 foraged in local wetlands and stayed around for the rest of the week. They arrived in Wisconsin March 18. They
    were observed building a nest on 27 March, but they discontinued use of that site. On April 13, they began incubating eggs in a new nest on their territory in Monroe County, WI. They did better than of any of the 5 nesting pairs, guarding their eggs and staying on the nest. But their clutch was lost after 15 days, before the eggs could hatch. The pair remained in the local area after loss of their nest. Then they moved to another place in Monroe County, where 302 was suspected to be molting.
    Death of #302 in July, 2006: On July 16 the carcass of #302 was discovered in an area with dense trees but no standing water. Cause of death was unknown, but it likely happened one to three weeks before his remains were found. By July 10th no signal from his mate (#209) was detected in the local area, signals received July 16 showed that #209 had moved. The reason why became clear when her mate's carcass was found. Male #302 is the first member of a breeding pair to die since the reintroduction began in 2001.
Banding:
G/W | G/R

303

  • Female
  • Hatched April 22nd
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Aggressive as a young chick but turned passive in June. Later she got a tenacious attitude back again. The first of the seventeen birds to officially get airborne. Her first short, low flight was on July 1st. She often led the training flights and was a high ranking bird in the social hierarchy of her group. Best buddies with #302. After the pre-migratory health check, she developed a limp that worsened. In early October, the team discovered she had a fractured knee. The break probably occurred during the health check handling, and she had surgery to correct it on October 7. She was reunited Oct. 17 with her flock mates and no aggression took place.
  • First Migration South: Due to doctors' orders, missed a total of 186.6 miles. She was crated to each migration stopover point and allowed to socialize with the cohort daily. On October 26 she flew her first migratory flight, leaving LaSalle Cty., IL, and going the whole 56.7-mile distance with her cohort! LOVES pumpkins and cranberries.
  • History: Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319.). (Follow the group's progress in the entry for #301. Note that she did leave with the other 7 on April 7, and when they returned she flew less than a minute with them before they all landed and remained for the night. Could #303 be the crane that hit the powerline when the group was harassed at the April 3 stopover site?) On April 9 the group separated south of Celina, Ohio. Birds 303, 312 & 16 retreated eastward, toward the location they had just left. They continued past the Auglaize County site, heading northeast. On April 11 Cranes 303, 312 & 316 were observed feeding in a cornfield in west-central Ohio. They remained until April 24, when the three headed north. On April 25th they continued northwest and encountered Lake Michigan on an unfamiliar side at exactly the same point that the group of five had two weeks earlier. Cranes 303, 312 & 316 remained together in Michigan but finally figured out how to get around the huge obstacle of Lake Michigan. They arrived in central Wisconsin on July 26 and were discovered near Necedah National Wildlife Refuge on July 28, completing their interrupted migration!
    Fall 2004: Cranes 303, 312 and 316 left Necedah Nov. 20 and flew to Jefferson Cty., WI. On Nov 22 they were in Cook County, IL. Stayed in LaPorte County, Indiana from Nov. 22 until resuming migration on Dec. 18-20. They roosted in or near Fairfield County, South Carolina, on Dec. 22nd, then moved to Marion County, FL. for several days. They arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site at midday on Jan. 2nd, roosting that night near the constructed oyster bar in the pen. They were the first HY2003 whooping cranes to return to the Chassahowitzka pen site after fall migration. Spent much of the winter on a horse farm in central FL.
    Spring 2005:
    #303, 312 and 316 departed on migration from Marion County, FL on March 20. Will they go back to MI or WI? PTT readings for 312 showed the group roosted in southern Indiana--on the correct migration route--on March 20! The three were reported back in Necedah area March 30. In April she apparently joined #307 and began hanging out with him. (Her radio transmitter is nonfunctional and she cannot be tracked.)
    Fall 2005: Began migration Nov. 17 with #216. They were tracked into northern IL, but their roost site was not determined. No further locations determined until they arrived at their old Florida pen site at Chassahowitzka NWR on December 14 at 2:25 PM! They moved later to a ranch in Pasco County, FL.
    Spring 2006:
    #303 left Florida around March 6 with #216. They were reported March 19 in TN. Her mate, #216, was next reported in central Minnesota on April 7, alone. Female #303 and her mate were the only one of last year's breeding pairs that had not arrived on their territory in Central Wisconsin by April 7. Severe storms or other disturbances may have separated them during migration. The location and fate of #303 was unknown until April 12 when her radio signals were heard over Necedah NWR! She landed on the territory she had with #216. She hung out with other males, but didn't pair again and #216 returned on April 19, injured. On 21 April she rejoined her original mate, #216, on the territory they had occupied in 2005. She left him for #311 and then #408, and then #317! These two cranes are blood siblings (they came from the same genetic parents in the captive breeding program at Patuxent WRC in Maryland). In a year, if they stay together, they will be of breeding age.

Banding:
G/R | W

Mate:
216

304
  • Male
  • Hatched April 24th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Average bird with no bad habits. Sara says it is the MOST IMPROVED bird and seems to have recovered from initial shyness. This is the bird that often stands outside the pen while the others chase after the aircraft. Then it seems to realize it can’t get back inside the pen so it flies after them and joins the training.
  • First Migration South: Flew every mile!
  • History: Attained adult voice end of March 2004.
    Spring 2004:
    Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes. #304, 306 and 317 stayed together, but flying southward. They landed in a north Florida wetland at 4:40 p.m. Cranes #304, 306 & 317 were detected inflight in northwestern Georgia or northeastern Alabama in late afternoon April 10 and in central IL on April 16. On April 17, #304, 306 and 317 were airborne at 9:40 a.m. Flying for almost 11 hours and well after darkness fell, they landed in southeast Minnesota, approximately 65 miles southwest of the Necedah NWR reintroduction site. They stayed in that MN location until April 23 and wandered until staying in LaCrosse County, WI. Crane #304 arrived at Necedah May 15, officially completing his migration.
    Fall 2004: Left Necedah NWR on Nov. 5 with #311 and flew to Kankakee Cty., IL. Still together, 304 and 311 arrived late Nov. 10 in Washington County, Georgia.  On Nov. 18, they were found in Glynn County, Georgia. Verified near McIntosh, Liberty County, GA on November 24th. Next located on Dec. 18 during an aerial-radio search in an area about 14 miles south of crane #317 in Colleton County, SC. Remained there in a Wildlife Management area with #311.
    Spring 2005:
    Not at the roost site on March 30. May have begun migration with #311. Cranes #311 and #304 joined with chick #412 over Indiana on April 6th! They were tracked into WI, where they were in Sauk County on April 7--migration complete. He was on the refuge all summer, was seen quite frequently and acted totally normal till he was found dead on October 27, 2005, with no outward trauma signs. A necropsy is being performed at the National Wildlife Health Center at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) to determine the cause of death.

Banding:
R/W/G | W/G

305
  • Male
  • Hatched April 29th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Probably the best flyer in the group but stand-offish to handlers. Very watchful and alert. In the beginning, stood away from the plane, but still paid very close attention to the trainers and plane.
  • First Migration South: Flew every mile!
  • History: Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). On April 9 the group separated south of Celina, Ohio. The group of five (301, 305, 309, 318, and 319) was stymied by being on an unfamiliar side of Lake Michigan. (Again see Crane #301 for updates on this group, which stayed in Michigan.)
    Fall 2004: Began migration from Mason County, Michigan on Nov. 7 with #301, 309 and 318. Killed by a predator, probably a bobcat, while roosting with 301, 309, and 318 on a mudflat on the Cape Romain NWR in Charleston County, SC on the nights of Nov. 12/13, 2004.
Banding:
W/R/G | G/R
306
  • Male
  • Hatched May 1st
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Good follower. Richard says he's unremarkable: always where he's supposed to be--and that's what makes him remarkable. Dan says #6 doesn't like him. "He's a tough bird who stands his ground but he's not aggressive."
  • First Migration South: Flew every mile!
  • History: Attained his adult voice in March, 2004. Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 and roosted there. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated them. Cranes #304, 306 and 317 stayed together, but flying southward. They landed in a north Florida wetland at 4:40 p.m. Cranes #304, 306 & 317 were detected inflight in northwestern Georgia or northeastern Alabama on April 10 and in Illinois on April 16. On April 17, #304, 306 and 317 flew for almost 11 hours; well after darkness fell, they landed in southeast Minnesota, approximately 65 miles southwest of the Necedah NWR reintroduction site. The three stayed in that MN location until April 23 and were seen flying along the Mississippi River in late April. Next were reported back at Necedah May 12. (On May 13, #218 led #306 and buddy #317 in flight to an area at Mill Bluff State Park where the 2002 cranes hang out--taking the youngsters under her wing.)
    Fall 2004: Left Necedah November 7 and flew to Iroquois County, IL, the same county that #302 has been occupying since Oct. 26th. Reported at Hiwassee State Wildlife Refuge in Meigs County, TN by Nov. 10 or sooner. Departed from Hiwassee to resume migration on Dec. 12. Wintered at Lake Woodruff NWR, Florida.
    Spring 2005: Began migration March 29 from Volusia County, FL. Roosted in Adams County, Wisconsin on April 3 with crane #201. By April 6 the two had moved to Juneau County, WI. They were seen in and around Necedah NWR throughout the summer. They sometimes associated with #304.
    Fall 2005: Began migration with #201 on November 17. They arrived at Jasper-Pulaski SWA, northwestern Indiana, in late afternoon. He and #201 were at Hiwassee (TN) when the 2005 ultralight chicks were there at the end of November. #306 was still at Hiwassee as of Dec. 14. They arrived at Lake Woodruff NWR, Florida, on December 20--where they spent the winter of 2004-05.
    Spring 2006: Began migration (with #201) on March 27 or 28. No reports received during migration. He and 201 were found back on their territory in Wood County, WI on April 6. (They may have arrived on April 4.)

Banding:
G/W/G | G/R

Mate:
201

307
  • Male
  • Hatched May 4th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Wimpy and small and often cries to the puppet. "Follows and begs right next to you, nonstop." Clingy. This bird loves to investigate and peck at the aircraft and will not leave it alone. Often appears as if he plans on jumping in the pilot's seat. VERY curious! 6/23: Handlers watched him find a garter snake, then shake it until it was dead. Crane #311 then swiped the snake and swallowed it whole! Wasn't yet a strong flyer at beginning of August. Reminds Brian of Crane #9 from the 2002 flock.
  • First Migration South: Flew all but 33.1 miles
  • History: Last of the 2003 chicks to attain adult voice.
    Spring 2004:
    Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes into 3 groups. Cranes #307, #302 and #311 --each now traveling solo--were located by radio signals April 9 in Georgia after each gained about another 100 miles. On April 10, #307 left the roost in Henry County, Georgia, at 9:29a.m. and was not tracked for several days. On April 16, several visual sightings of #307 in flight were made. On June 2 he arrived at Necedah NWR, HOME to roost!
    Fall 2004: He departed Necedah NWR on migration, and guided the now-feathered youngster #418 along with him! The two landed to roost in west-central Indiana the first day out. Unfortunately, #307 took off again and flew about 60 miles farther, leaving untrained #418 behind. On Nov. 10, #307 roosted just shy of the southeast coast of Georgia in McIntosh County. He was found in Chatham County, Georgia, on Nov. 14-15th. By Nov. 17th, he had moved to Beaufort County, South Carolina. He remained in marsh and a harvested cornfields in southeast South Carolina, just north of the Georgia State line, through at least Feb. 7, 2005.
    Spring 2005: On April 4 he spent time in Monroe County, WI and completed migration to Necedah NWR that evening. Later in the week he moved to an area south of Necedah NWR where he spent time in 2004, but returned to Necedah NWR in April. He apparently joined #303 (nonfunctional transmitter) on 17 April and both birds were later found near Paul J. Olson SWA, Portage and Wood Counties, where they stayed for several days. He was last seen August 4 on Necedah NWR with #402, 403, 412, 416 and 417. (He cannot be tracked because his transmitter no longer works.) He was seen often in summer and fall on Necedah NWR.
    Fall 2005: Began migration November 17. Arrived at Jasper-Pulaski SWA, northwestern Indiana, in late afternoon. He was next reported on Nov. 29, alone in Jackson County, Alabama. He was still there in mid December. He did not reappear on his previous wintering site in Beaufort County, South Carolina.
    Spring 2006: Detected Dec. 2 in Alabama and not detected again until found at Necedah April 5! He probably arrived Apr 2.
Banding:
R/W/G | G/R
309
  • Female
  • Hatched May 5th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Most independent of this cohort. Strays farthest from trike during taxiing sessions. Small female but now dedicated to the aircraft and follows everywhere. Brian called her a super forager: "You could drop that bird in the middle of a city and she'd find something to eat!"
  • First Migration South: Flew all but about 18 miles
  • History: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. Spring 2004: March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). (Follow the group's progress to April 9 in the entry for #301.) On April 9 the group separated south of Celina, Ohio. The group of five (301, 305, 309, 318, and 319) was stymied by being on an unfamiliar side of Lake Michigan. (Again see Crane #301 for updates on this group that stayed in Michigan.)
    Fall 2004:
    Began fall migration from Mason County, Michigan, on Nov. 7. with #305, 309 and 301. Perhaps spooked by witnessing the death of their flock mate #305 on Nov. 13/14, this crane together with #301 and #318 moved northward the next day to Georgetown County, South Carolina. After several short northward flights, the three began moving south. Found in Jones County, NC on Nov. 20, and they spent the winter in NC.
    Spring 2005:
    Began migration from Jones County, NC March 30 with #301 and #318. Seen April 6 with #301 and #318 in western New York state. They apparently followed the Lake Michigan lakeshore northeast. Unconfirmed sightings and PTT readings put them on the east side of Lake Huron on April 13. They would have to somehow get around two of the Great Lakes to make it home to central Wisconsin. (The Tracking team may need to capture and relocate the birds back to Wisconsin in an effort to reorient them.) On April 15 the three were confirmed in Ontario, east of Lake Huron. They will most likely be returned to Wisconsin in an attempt to reorient them. With two of the Great Lakes separating them from the core introduction area, there is little likelihood they would make it back on their own. For now, they need to be in near the rest of the population. The more opportunity they have to mingle, the greater the chance of proper mate selection and eventual breeding. The three cranes were next seen on April 14 in Grey County, Ontario. On May 8, #309 was alone on the northern shore of the St. Lawrence River, northeast of Lake Ontario, just across the U.S. (New York) border. She was seen leaving the area on that morning after a one-night stop. She was next spotted in west central Vermont on June 9. The WCEP tracking team hoped to catch her if she stayed there, but she flew away on June 30th. The flooded fields where she'd been staying were drying up, so it's not surprising that she left. She was next reported on August 11-13 at a wet hayfield near Lowville in Lewis County, New York."She's an important bird to the program, and if we leave her where she is we eliminate any chance there is that this bird will mate," said OM pilot Joe Duff. "She's a good, wild bird, certainly independent. The only problem is she happens to be a lost.
    Fall 2005: She was reported again on October 27, 2005 near her last sighting in northeastern New York. And then—HOORAY!—reported Dec. 9 ( confirmed by a photo) on a farm in Beaufort County, North Carolina. She was still there on December 12. Because #309 has had trouble migrating, she was captured on Dec. 16 (see photo and details above, right) and released her in a cattle pasture with yearling females #419 and #420 in Madison County, FL. The two yearlings threatened and chased #309. She moved to an area with one whooping crane (#415) and more than a thousand wintering sandhill cranes. Here's hoping #309 finds and remains with other whooping cranes at least long enough to form a pair bond with a male. On January 14 #309 went to the pen site at Chassahowitzka NWR. She joined them in the main pen when the top net was removed on Jan. 21, 2006. She is a very submissive bird. She appears thrilled to have some friends again, and doesn't bother the younger birds. Mark said she's more of a chick than most of the 2005 flock! "She is cute, getting the chicks all riled up by calling and jumping around. This is common for her, but it usually just seems to be her wanting to get her turn at the feeders. I think that in her mind, it is always her turn at the feeders. She is a funny bird. She does a lot of preening and makes sure she is always looking her best. Then she also has a permanent splotch at the base of her neck on her chest that looks like she is dirty."
    Spring 2006: Left the "Chass" pen with chick #520 on March 27. She has never found her way back to Wisconsin on spring migration, but she now wears a PTT for tracking. On March 29-30, the two were still together in Tennessee, right on track for Wisconsin. The two resumed migration from farmland in Indiana on 2 April. According to PTT readings, they roosted that night in Huntington County, Indiana; on 3 April in Allen County, Indiana; and on 4-5 April along the western shore of Lake Huron in Sanilac County, Michigan. On 6 April they continued northward and stayed along the shore of Lake Huron in Huron County, MI until April 13 when they moved into Ontario, Canada. On Apr 15 they continued eastward re-entered the U.S. to roost in Jefferson County, NY. Both birds returned to Lewis County, NY, before moving on 21 April to Addison County, Vermont. They flew back to Lewis County NY (the area that #309 occupied in the spring of 2005) on April 29.The two were captured May 5 and flown in private plane back to Necedah NWR in Wisconsin. This is 309's first time back to Wisconsin since she left on migration with the ultralight plane in fall 2003.
Banding:
W/G | G/R
310
  • Male
  • Hatched May 6th
  • Origin: San Antonio Zoo
  • Personality Characteristics: Aggression issues with #311. Separated upon arrival at Necedah so they could socialize through a fence without harming each other. Despite initial aggression problems with #311, the two now hang together and #310 is torn between following the aircraft and staying with #311, who is aloof and standoffish to the costumed handlers. By October, this bird was beating up on everybody, and might be the top bird (or close to top) in the flock. He is always in the training group that's flying without problems turning back or dropping out.
  • First Migration South: Turned back and landed at Necedah on day 1 of the migration along with 302, 311 and 313. Crated and transported to first stopover. Flew all but about 33.1 miles of the migration, missing a leg (a day's flight) in TN.
  • History: Acquired adult voice week in Jan., 2004. Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes into 3 groups. #313 and #310 were later found by a pond in a s. Georgia pasture--within 3 miles of the southward migration route! Cranes 310 and 313 were not tracked on Apr. 10 or 11. Next reported in Illinois on April 16 and at a small pond in northwest Iowa on April 17. Arrived at Necedah NWR with #313 on April 19.
    Fall 2004: #310 and 313 began migration from Juneau County, WI on Nov 7 and flew to Kankankee Cty., IL. They were next tracked on Nov. 15 in Nelson County, Kentucky where they remained at least through December 5. They were no longer at this site when it was checked on Dec. 15. Next located with #302 and #313 during an aerial survey by Lara Fondow on January 18, 2005 in a managed wetland in Colleton County, South Carolina.
    Spring 2005:
    Began migration March 20 together with #302 and #313. Reported wandering in Michigan with #313 the first half of April. Joe Duff says, "They are far enough south that they could circumnavigate Lake Michigan and make it home, but none of us holds out much hope." They were last detected in flight in southeastern MI from tracking aircraft on the west side of Lake Michigan on 14 April. Finally, the best news of all: the wandering #310 and #313 arrived on Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) on May 21! Moved from Necedah October 16 to nearby Mill Bluff State Park, often seen with other whooping cranes in the area.
    Fall 2005: Began migration on November 21. He was reported several times in Colleton County, South Carolina, where he spent last winter.
    Spring 2006: Departed South Carolina March 9. Back at Necedah NWR in Wisconsin by March 31.

Banding:
W/G/R | G/R
311
  • Male
  • Hatched May 6th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: He and #310 hated each other and were separated upon arrival at Necedah so they could continue to socialize through fence without harming each other. They got along better later. On 6/23 this crane watched #307 work hard to kill a garter snake--and then he stole it away from 307 and swallowed it whole. Occasionally prefers to wander off into the marsh during training. Has made great progress, after a rough start when he ignored the aircraft and handlers. They spent much time with 311 to improve his performance. Since then he has discovered the wing vortices (air currents that help him fly) and is a great follower.
  • First Migration South: On day one of the migration south, he turned back to the pen at Necedah and was trucked to the stopover site 302, 310 and 313. On day 2 he kept turning back. Brooke convinced the wayward crane to stick with him, and then the bird didn't want to land!  He kept circling and flying until eventually Brooke and Joe both went to chase him down. Joe caught up and guided the bird to a landing next to the temporary enclosure with the others. Made the entire leg to the 3rd location, but once again was reluctant to land. Missed a total of 86.3 miles (TN).
  • History: Acquired adult voice in Jan., 2004. Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes into 3 groups. Cranes #302, 307 and 311 --each now traveling solo--were located by radio signals April 9 in Georgia after each gaining about another 100 miles. On April 10, #311 left his roost in Gwinnett County, Georgia, at 8:55 a.m. and landed to roost in east-central Tennessee at 3:45 p.m. Detected April 14 in KY, April 15 in IN and April 16 in south-central Wisconsin--and April 18 very near Necedah NWR--first of the 2003 chicks to arrive! (He didn't actually return to the refuge itself until May 1.) He then settled in a favorite spot about 12 miles to the south, and only visited the refuge briefly again in mid-May.
    Fall 2004: Left Necedah NWR on Nov. 5 with #304 and flew to Kankakee Cty, IL. Still together, 304 and 311 arrived late Nov. 10 in Washington County, Georgia.  On Nov. 18, they were found in Glynn County, Georgia. Verified near McIntosh, Liberty County, GA on November 24th. Next located on Dec. 18 during an aerial-radio search in an area about 14 miles south of crane #317 in southeast South Carolina. Remained there in a Wildlife Management area with #304. Spring 2005: Not at the roost site on March 30. Possibly gone on migration with #304. Cranes #311 and #304 joined with chick #412 over Indiana on April 6th! They were tracked into WI, where they were in Sauk County on April 7.
    Fall 2005: Began migration Nov. 17 with #301. They later joined in flight with #102, #212, #203 and #317. The group roosted that night in Will County, IL. They flew Nov. 18 to SW of Indianapolis, Indiana. They were all still at this Marion County, IN stopover site in mid-December. On Dec. 20, a pair of whoopers that might have been #301/#311 were sighted on Colleton County, SC. The pair arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site on Dec. 22.
    They remained in the pen area and made several short flights in the next few days.
    Spring 2006: Still in SC on March 23 but this bird (with #301??) may be one of the two reported back in Michigan April 2. This was the same general area occupied by#301 and #318 in 2004 and 2005 before the latter two birds were retrieved and re-released in Central Wisconsin early last summer (2005). SURPRISE! On April 6,#301 and #311 were found back on their territory at Wisconsins' Necedah NWR. They apparently flew over or around Lake Michigan to complete migration. On April 7 the pair was observed building a nest. Then they had a stand-off with some other whooping cranes and now 301 left. On May 10, 303 joined him. On Oct. 20, 2006, his radio transmitter was replaced so it's working again!
Banding:
G/W/R | G/R
312
  • Female
  • Hatched May 14th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Just a good bird with no bad habits and a good follower. Certainly no wimp! Fairly dominant. Challenges costumed "strangers," such as visiting veterinarians or aviculturalists. Likes to be part of the group during flights. Gets anxious if she is a lone crane with one of the ultralights, and keeps glancing at the main flock as if she would prefer to join them.
  • First Migration South: Flew all but 33.1 miles (TN)
  • History: Acquired adult voice first week of Feb., 2004. Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). (Follow the group's progress in the entry for 301.) Birds 303, 312 & 16 retreated eastward, toward the location they had just left. (See next details at #303, above.)
    In April, crane #312 was injured by an aluminum can that became stuck around her bill, preventing eating or drinking. Richard Urbanek discovered the alarming situation. He quickly donned a costume and captured, helped, and released her. She recovered well. Cranes 303, 312 & 316 remained together in Michigan, stymied by the huge obstacle of Lake Michigan. They arrived in central Wisconsin on July 26 and were discovered near Necedah National Wildlife Refuge on July 28, finally completing their interrupted migration!
    Fall 2004: Cranes 303, 312 and 316 left Necedah Nov. 20 and flew to Jefferson Cty., WI. On Nov 22 they were in Cook County, IL. Stayed in LaPorte County, Indiana from Nov. 22 until resuming migration on Dec. 18-20. They roosted in or near Fairfield County, South Carolina, on Dec. 22nd, then moved to Marion County, FL. for several days. They arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site at midday on Jan. 2nd, roosting that night near the constructed oyster bar in the pen. They were the first HY2003 whooping cranes to return to the Chassahowitzka pen site after fall migration. Spent much of the winter on a horse farm in central FL.
    Spring 2005:
    #303, 312 & 316 departed on migration from Marion County, FL on March 20. Will they go back to MI or WI? PTT readings for 312 showed the group roosted in southern IN--on the correct migration route--on March 20! The three were reported back in Necedah area March 30. Cranes #312 and #316 continued to hang out together near Necedah NWR and nearby counties.
    Fall 2005: She and #316 were not found in their usual area on Nov. 17, a day when 18 whoopers began migration from the area. They showed up with sandhill cranes at other spots in the next few days and likely began migration on Nov. 24. On Dec. 1 they arrived and stayed in Marion County on Florida's Gulf Coast north of the pen for ultralight-led chicks at Chassahowitzka NWR!
    Spring 2006: She and #316 likely began migration from Marion County, FL on March 1. No further reports of #312, although #316 was home in Wisconsin on March 17. No signal or sighting of #312. On April 9, #312 was found back at Necedah NWR! She and #316 were seen back together on 20 April. They had likely reunited earlier in the week.
Banding:
W/R | G/R
313
  • Female
  • Hatched May 17th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Large, aggressive, dominant female who often chases off the big white older cranes from the 2001 and 2002 ultralight groups. Feisty with costumed handlers. Like to assert authority. Turned back and landed at Necedah on day 1 of the migration along with 302, 310 and 311.
  • Migration South: Flew every mile!
  • History: Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7 at 9:10 a.m. They flew until rain stopped them, landing in Jefferson Cty., FL at 3:35 where they roosted that night. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the cranes into 3 groups. #313 and #310 were later found by a pond in a south Georgia pasture--within 3 miles of the southward migration route! Next reported in Illinois on April 16 and at a small pond in northwest Iowa on April 17. Arrived home at Necedah NWR April 19 with #310.
    Fall 2004: #310 and 313 began migration from Juneau County, WI on Nov. 7 and flew to Kankankee Cty., IL. They were next tracked on Nov. 15 in Nelson County, Kentucky where they remained at least through December 5. They were no longer at this site when it was checked on Dec. 15. The three birds were next located together during an aerial survey by Lara Fondow on January 18, 2005 in a managed wetland in Colleton County, South Carolina.
    Spring 2005:
    Began migration March 20 together with #310. The two were reported wandering in Michigan the first half of April. Joe Duff says, "They are far enough south that they could circumnavigate Lake Michigan and make it home, but none of us holds out much hope." Cranes #310 and #313 were detected in flight in SE Michigan from tracking aircraft on the west side of Lake Michigan on 14 April. And then---surprise! On May 21 #310 and #313 arrived on Necedah National Wildlife Refuge(NWR). She was seen several times with #208 during the summer.
    Fall 2005: Began migration on Nov. 24 with #205. Migrating together, they reached #205's former winter home on a Pasco County ranch in Florida, on December 1. By the end of December, at least 100 sandhill cranes were there along with whooping cranes#102, #212, #208, #105, and #204. The pair (#205/#313) unison-called when the newly arrived whooping cranes flew over them.
    Spring 2006: Crane #313 (together with #205) began migration from a cattle ranch in Pasco County, Florida on February 28. A pair of cranes reported March 3 in Indiana could have been this pair. They were confirmed home in Wisconsin March 17.
Banding:
R/W/R | G/R
314
  • Female
  • Hatched May 17th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Slight limp, aggravated by running after aircraft. She is very intent to follow the trike despite the limp - may be a slipped tendon. At times reluctant to come out of the pen. Once out, however, it is a good follower. Once it gets better at flying and does not need to run as much this bird should be more enthusiastic.
  • Sustained serious injuries during training Aug. 7th when she apparently ventured too close to the rear wheel of the ultralight as it was taxiing for take-off.  The injured bird was immediately transported to the International Crane Foundation for evaluation and medical treatment. Shortly after arriving at the crane foundation, Dr. Barry Hartup reported to the team that the 82-day old female Whooping crane went into cardiopulmonary arrest while already under anesthesia, and the decision was made not to attempt resuscitation due to the extent of her injuries and poor prognosis for recovery.
Banding:
W
316
  • Male
  • Hatched May 19th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Originally a bit aggressive toward the others. Separated upon release at West site training area to avoid issues. Able to socialize through fence until aggressive tendencies subsided. All of the birds from cohort three are going through their independent stage and often ignore the aircraft and handlers. #316 is among the worst. At times reluctant to come out of pen for training, but he follows well once out of the pen. Got a cut on his foot and had to be kept out of water for a time due to infection. The cut healed well with medicine.
  • Migration South: Flew all but 33.1 miles (TN).
  • History: Attained adult voice in Jan., 2004. Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). (Follow the group's progress in the entry for 301.) Birds 303, 312 & 16 retreated eastward (Follow the group's progress in the entry for 303.) Crane #316 later split off in SW Michigan, but later completed his interrupted migration and returned to Necedah NWR on July 28 along with #312 and #316.
    Fall 2004: Cranes 303, 312 and 316 left Necedah Nov. 20 and flew to Jefferson Cty., WI. On Nov 22 they were in Cook County, IL. Stayed in LaPorte County, Indiana from Nov. 22 until resuming migration on Dec. 18-20. They roosted in or near Fairfield County, South Carolina, on Dec. 22nd, then moved to Marion County, FL. for several days. They arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site at midday on Jan. 2nd, roosting that night near the constructed oyster bar in the pen. They were the first HY2003 whooping cranes to return to the Chassahowitzka pen site after fall migration. Spent much of the winter on a horse farm in central FL.
    Spring 2005:
    303, 312 & 316 departed on migration from Marion County, FL on March 20. Will they go back to MI or WI? PTT readings for #312 showed the group roosted in southern IN--on the correct migration route--on March 20! The three were reported back in the Necedah area March 30, and #316 continued to hang out with #312.
    Fall 2005: He and #312 were not found in their usual area on Nov. 17, a day when 18 whoopers began migration from the area. They showed up with sandhill cranes at other spots in the next few days and likely began migration on Nov. 24. On Dec. 1 they arrived and stayed in Marion County on Florida's Gulf Coast north of the pen for ultralight-led chicks at Chassahowitzka NWR!
    Spring 2006: He and #312 began migration from Marion County, FL on March 1. No further reports until March 17, when #316 was home, near Necedah NWR in Wisconsin. The pair #312 and #316 were seen back together on 20 April. They had likely reunited earlier in the week.
Banding:
R/G/W | G/R
317
  • Male
  • Hatched May 20th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Somewhat shy and loves the wet pen so much that he will not come out unless bribed with treats. Seemed low on the pecking order but was more comfortable with the group by end of August.
  • Migration South: One of the six cranes (with 301,305,319, 212 and 316) that flew the whole first leg. Got tired and dropped out 8 miles short of 4th migration stop, so was crated and transported to location. That's the only 8 miles of the migration it did not fly.
  • History: Attained adult voice during the third week of March, 2004. Spring 2004: Left Chassahowitzka together with the other 7 remaining chicks on April 7. They flew until rain stopped them, roosting that night in Jefferson Cty., FL. Took off April 8 in the group of 8 but a thunderstorm separated the eight. Cranes #304, 306 and 317 stayed together, but flying southward. They landed in a north Florida wetland at 4:40 p.m. Cranes #304, 306 & 317 were last detected inflight in northwestern Georgia or northeastern Alabama in late afternoon April 10; in KY April 15, and in IL on April 16. On April 17, #304, 306 and 317 flew for almost 11 hours and landed in SE Minnesota well after darkness fell. This was approximately 65 miles southwest of their Necedah NWR reintroduction site. The three stayed in that MN location until April 23 and were seen flying along the Mississippi River in late April. Next went to Trempeleau County, WI, and were finally reported back at Necedah May 12. Later moved to nearby Mill Bluff State Park with several 2002 ultracranes from the 2002 flock.
    Fall 2004: Left Wisconsin October 23 with #317 and occupying Iroquois County, IL, since Oct. 26th. Detected migrating November 7 and trackers suspected he landed in Vermillion County, Illinois. Roosted in Orangeburg County, South Carolina on Nov. 10. Was in Colleton County, South Carolina, and remained in a large complex of wetlands and flooded cornfields in the southeast portion of South Carolina. Last observed Jan. 31.
    Spring 2005:
    Began migration from Colleton County, South Carolina, between March 11 and 15. Reported in a flock of migrating sandhill cranes in Berrien County, Michigan, on March 18. Back on Necedah NWR on April 6. Observed building a nest with #203 on the Refuge. The pair stayed around their established territory all summer.
    Fall 2005: After 4 tries, ICF's Sara Zimorski and Richard Urbanek finally caught this bird on November 11. They replaced his transmitter and broken antenna so he can still be radio-tracked. He began migration Nov. 17 with #203. They later joined in flight with #102 & #212, #301 & #311. The group roosted that night in Will County, IL. They flew Nov. 18 to SW of Indianapolis, Indiana. They were still at this Marion County stopover in mid-December. He landed at the Chassahowitzka NWR pen in Florida on Dec. 22, along with #203. They moved to Sumter County, FL the next day, but returned to check out the Chass pen on Dec. 24.
    Spring 2006: #317 and mate #203 left Florida on Feb. 1 with pair #301 and #311. They were last tracked on 2 February, when they were in flight over northcentral Okefenokee Swamp. They were on a heading for the place in South Carolina where #317 had wintered one year earlier. They arrived back on their territory at Wisconsin's Necedah NWR on March 18 or 19. They began incubating on or by April 7, but the eggs were lost to a predator by April 16. In July, his mate (#203) was killed by a predator. Soon after, #317 returned to his old territory after "stealing" female #303 away from her new pal #408. If they stay together, these two could mate in 2007, but they are blood siblings (they share the same genetic parents from the captive breeding program in Maryland).

Banding:
W/G/W | G/R

Mate:
203

318
  • Male
  • Hatched May 21st
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: This may be the dominant bird in the cohort and is a good follower--if pilots can keep his attention. They have used the Swamp Monster to convince 310 not to venture off into the marsh; it seemed to work. Good sized, aggressive and dominant, even though he's a younger bird in this flock.
  • Migration South: Flew all but 68.3 miles.
  • History: Attained his adult voice Feb. 1-7, 2004. Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). (Follow the group's progress to April 9 in the entry for 301.) On April 9 the group separated south of Celina, Ohio. The group of five (301, 305, 309, 318, and 319) was stymied by being on an unfamiliar side of Lake Michigan. (Again see Crane #301 for updates on this group that stayed in Michigan.)
    Fall 2004: Began fall migration from Mason County, Michigan, on Nov. 7. with #305, 309 and 301. Perhaps spooked by witnessing the death of their flock mate, #305 on Nov. 13/14, this crane together with #301 and #309 moved northward the next day to Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center in Georgetown County, South Carolina. After several short northward flights, the three began moving south. Found in Jones County, NC.
    Spring 2005:
    Departed Jones County, NC on migration March 30 with #301 and #309. Seen April 6 with #301 and #309 in western New York state, just across the Penn. border. They apparently followed the Lake Michigan lakeshore NE. Unconfirmed sightings and PTT readings put them on the east side of Lake Huron on April 13. This would mean they would have to somehow get around two of the Great Lakes to make it home. The Tracking team may need to capture and relocate the birds back to Wisconsin in an effort to reorient them. On April 15 the three were confirmed in Ontario, east of Lake Huron. They will most likely be returned to Wisconsin in an attempt to reorient them. With two of the Great Lakes separating them from the core introduction area, there is little likelihood they would make it back on their own. For now, they need to be in proximity to the rest of the population. The more opportunity they have to mingle, the greater the chance of proper mate selection and eventually breeding. Still with #301 on April 16 when a PTT reading indicated that #301 roosted in Algonquin Provincial Park near the Quebec border and then left the following morning. Low-quality readings for #301 on April 17-20 showed movement southbound to near the northern shore of Lake Ontario. The next reported sighting of #301 and #318 was on April 22 in a harvested cornfield on the southern shore of Georgian Bay. The two were still there on 25 April. (No reports of the third crane, #309, being with them since 14 April.) On April 27, #301 and #318 left Owen Sound and were seen near Tobermory (northern tip of the Bruce Peninsula, Ontario). Next confirmed in Chippewa Cty. on April 29. Then poor quality PTT readings in mid May indicate they had flown southward into the north-central Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Sure enough, 301 and 318 were finally confirmed by a citizen sighting 22 May in central Missaukee Co, MI. On the evening of June 30, #301 and #318 were successfully captured in Michigan by WCEP trackers. They were transported by aircraft to the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge and released. Both birds appear to be well. Hooray! Spent time with a large staging sandhill crane flock in Wood County in October.
    Fall 2005: Began migration on November 21. Reported wintering in North Carolina's Columbus County and also Reeve County.The team is concerned about his welfare at this location because he seems to be getting used to local vehicular traffic and nearness of humans.
    Spring 2006: Departed on migration April 1 or 2 from South Carolina. Crane #318 was reported by a citizen in Canada on April 6 and 13. The Ontario location was in the same area visited by #318, #301 and #309 during spring migration 2005. He remained at the same location in Grey County, Ontario, Canada until 16 April. On that morning he was reported headed northwest with six Sandhills. He was next reported in Montcalm County, Michigan on 22 April.
Banding:
G/R/W | G/R
319
  • Male
  • Hatched May 23rd
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: The wimpiest bird and the one that causes trainers the most worry, but also the youngest so maybe it will come around. Trainers spend more time with this crane than any. It started out gate-shy and nervous about being away from the wet pen. Often ignores the costumed handlers unless they have treats. Not a dominant bird, but no longer gate-shy by end of August. By migration time this bird was much improved and very attentive to the aircraft.
  • Migration South: Flew every mile!
  • History: Spring 2004: Began first migration north at 9:33 a.m. March 30, 2004 in a group of eight 2003 flock mates (301, 303, 305, 309, 312, 316, 318, 319). (Follow the group's progress to April 9 in the entry for 301.) On April 9 the group flew westward and separated south of Celina, Ohio. Sadly, this young male was lost to predation during the last week of July '04 at his Michigan roost site.
Banding:
W/R/W | G/R

 

Home | Our Work | Get Involved | In the Field
Merchandise | Links | Contact Us