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Bird Bio's - Class of '04

The Whooping cranes are numbered according to the order in which they hatched at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center.  The first digit indicates the year in which they hatched, and the last two digits indicates the order in which they hatched. 

Example: crane #401 is the first hatch of 2004. Crane #412 was the twelfth chick hatched in the year 2004. 

ID#
Chick Photo
Personality Characteristics/Field Notes
Fledged Photo

401

  • Male
  • Hatched April 20th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 8-days of age. Received 6 hrs & 24 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) Followed the trike well from the start, and also did well when left alone. Very small bird and rather submissive. Loves the costume and is a bit clingy around it. Follows and begs for treats.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #401 stayed with 407, 408 and 414. They returned to their previous roost in Fond du Lac County, WI and were gone when the site was checked on April 7. They were next seen April 14 during an aerial search in Winnebago County, Illinois, in a harvested cornfield 1 mile south of the Wisconsin border. They roosted at this location and foraged in cornfields on both sides of the Illinois-Wisconsin state line until 25 April when they proceeded northward to roost in Adams County, WI---27 miles from Necedah NWR. On April 27 they completed migration to Necedah NWR, then flew to nearby Yellow River Cranberry, just east of the Refuge, to join #312 and #316. They stayed there several days, but #401,#407 and #408 departed the area on May 3 (after #414 was killed by a large predator the night of May 2). On May 9 and 10, they were confirmed in southeastern Wisconsin. These three flew into southeastern Minnesota in mid June in wandering behavior that is is normal for yearling cranes. During summer, #401, 407, and 408 roosted together back at Necedah NWR.
    Fall 2005: Cooler temperatures at the end of August prompted some early autumn staging/pre-migratory activity, and the three birds moved from Necedah NWR to Morrison County in central Minnesota. They were seen there on several dates up to Nov. 9. They were next sighted Nov. 22 in Washington County, Indiana—on migration! They were using the shallow edge of a lake and foraging in a harvested cornfield next to the lake. They roosted near Hiwassee NWR in TN on Nov. 24. On Nov. 24 they were in Sumter County, GA. On Nov. 30, cranes #401, 407, and 408 completed migration when they arrived at the Chassahowitzka pen site. They soon moved on to other nearby areas.
    Spring 2006: Still with #407 and #408, he left Madison County, Florida, and flew into Georgia on March 9. They completed migration to Wisconsin's Necedah NWR March 20.

Banding:
R/G/W | W/G
402
  • Male
  • Hatched April 21st
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 8-days of age. Received 8 hrs & 10 min. of aircraft conditioning at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC). Good follower. Wants to be in charge. Clobbered the younger #407 when the younger chick bit him on the neck.
  • First Migration South: Crated to destination on Day 1 and dropped out on Day 2 (crated again). Crated to Kankakee Cty, IL on day 22. On day 36, decided that while it couldn't manage to follow the aircraft another 5 miles into Oldham County, it could still fly for more than 7 hours (all over Kentucky, and southeast Indiana) before he was retrieved by trackers. Often called a toublemaker (along with 405 and 408).
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #402 stayed with 3, 15, 16, 17, 19 and 20. They remained in Dane County, WI and finally arrived on Necedah NWR on May 3, migration complete! During the summer, cranes #402, 403, 412, 416, and 417 roosted as a group, often with sandhill cranes. They spent time in Columbia and Marquette counties, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #403, 412, 416, and 417. They made it to Indiana the first day. On November 10 they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. According to tracker Lara Fondow, the five males landed at their former pen site in Florida at 2:05 November 17. They are the first Eastern flock whoopers to complete migration to the primary wintering area in west-central Florida this fall! With no free food at the pen, they wandered north the next day. Spring 2006: Began migration on March 27 or 28 in a group with 403, 412, 416 and 417. They were reported in Dane County, WI on March 31. They moved up to Necedah NWR to complete their migration on April 6!
Banding:
W/R/W | W/G

403

  • Male
  • Hatched April 21st
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 8 days. Received 9 hrs & 10 min. of aircraft conditioning while at PWRC. Big and dominate, he's one of the top birds. A pig for treats.  
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4.  On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #403 stayed with 2, 15, 16, 17, 19 and 20. They remained in Dane County, WI and finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3. During the summer, cranes #402, 403, 412, 416, and 417 roosted as a group, often with sandhill cranes. They spent time in Columbia and Marquette Counties, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #402, 412, 416, and 417. They made it to Indiana the first day.On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. According to tracker Lara Fondow, the five males landed at their former pen site in Florida at 2:05 November 17. They are the first Eastern flock whoopers to complete migration to the primary wintering area in west-central Florida this fall! With no free food at the pen, they wandered north the next day.
    Spring 2006: Began migration on March 27 or 28 in a group with 402, 412, 416 and 417. They were reported in Dane County, WI on March 31. They moved up to Necedah NWR to complete their migration on April 6!
Banding:
G/R/W | W/G
405
  • Male
  • Hatched April 24th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 7 days. Received 8 hrs & 55 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. Even though an older bird, got along better with birds much younger than himself. Easily intimidated by older birds and flew off by himself to avoid them. Moved to a younger cohort (group) and did better when he towered over the smaller birds.
  • First Migration South: Fall 2004
    One of the seven who flew on day 1. Often called a troublemaker (along with 402 and 408).
  • History: The carcass of #405 was found March 14, 2005 on a creek bank 200 meters south of the Florida pen. He was apparently killed by a bobcat during the night.

Banding:
R/W/G | W/G

407
  • Male
  • Hatched May 5th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 7 days. Received 7 hrs & 5 min. of aircraft conditioning while at PWRC. Was often a "jerk" in his small group but got clobbered when he picked on the older 402, who then proved HE was boss.
  • First Migration South:Didn't fly on Day 1 and dropped out on Day 2.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4.  On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #407 stayed with 401, 408 and 414. They returned to their previous roost in Fond du Lac County, WI and were gone when the site was checked on April 7. They were next seen April 14 during an aerial search in Winnebago County, Illinois, in a harvested cornfield 1 mile south of the Wisconsin border. They roosted at this location and foraged in cornfields on both sides of the Illinois-Wisconsin state line until 25 April when they proceeded northward to roost in Adams County, WI---27 miles from Necedah NWR.  On April 27 they completed migration to Necedah NWR, then flew to nearby Yellow River Cranberry, just east of the Refuge, to join #312 and #316. They stayed there several days, but #401, #407 and #408 departed the area on May 3 (after #414 was killed by a large predator the night of May 2). On May 9 and 10, they were confirmed in southeastern Wisconsin. These three wandered into southeastern Minnesota in mid June in wandering that is is normal behavior for yearling cranes. During summer, #401, 407, and 408 roosted together back at Necedah NWR.
    Fall 2005: Cooler temperatures at the end of August prompted some early autumn staging/pre-migratory activity, and the three birds moved from Necedah NWR to Morrison County in central Minnesota. They were seen there on several dates up to Nov. 9. They were next sighted Nov. 22 in Washington County, Indiana—on migration! They were using the shallow edge of a lake and foraging in a harvested cornfield next to the lake. They roosted near Hiwassee NWR in TN on Nov. 24. On Nov. 24 they were in Sumter County, GA. On Nov. 30, cranes #401, 407, and 408 completed migration when they arrived at the Florida pen site. They soon moved on to other nearby areas.
    Spring 2006: Still with #401 and #408, he left Madison County, Florida, and flew into Georgia on March 9. They completed migration to Wisconsin's Necedah NWR March 20. He must like Minnesota, because he and the younger #507 moved there the end of August. A PTT reading for #508 on the night of 8 September 8 indicated that the pair #508 and #407 were in the southeastern MINNESOTA area where #407 had been present at the same time in 2005. They later moved to Marathon County, Wisconsin, where they hung out with a flock of sandhill cranes.
Banding:
W/R/G | W/G
408
  • Male
  • Hatched May 6th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 9 days. Received 7 hrs & 5 min. of aircraft conditioning while at PWRC. At first showed a bit of anxiety when the costumed caretaker left, but later grew mellow, low-key and laid-back. Loves treats. After the health check didn't care about bring handled and having a radio transmitter on his leg, so long as treats were being passed out.
  • First Migration South:Often challenged for the lead position on the aircraft wing. On the Dec. 12 final flight, he nipped at the wing of the lead bird to challenge it to move over! Often called a toublemaker (along with 402 and 405).
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4.  On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #408 stayed with 401, 407 and 414. They returned to their previous roost in Fond du Lac County, WI and were gone when the site was checked on April 7.  They were next seen April 14 during an aerial search in Winnebago County, Illinois, in a harvested cornfield 1 mile south of the Wisconsin border. They roosted at this location and foraged in cornfields on both sides of the Illinois-Wisconsin state line until 25 April when they proceeded northward to roost in Adams County, WI---27 miles from Necedah NWR. On April 27 they completed migration to Necedah NWR, then flew to nearby Yellow River Cranberry, just east of the Refuge, to join #312 and #316. They stayed there several days, but #401,#407 and #408 departed the area on May 3 (after #414 was killed by a large predator the night of May 2). On May 9 and 10, they were confirmed in southeastern Wisconsin. These three wandered into southeastern Minnesota in mid June, which is normal behavior for yearling cranes. During summer, #401, 407, and 408 roosted together back at Necedah NWR.
    Fall 2005: Cooler temperatures at the end of August prompted some early autumn staging/pre-migratory activity, and the three birds moved from Necedah NWR to Morrison County in central Minnesota. They were seen there on several dates up to Nov. 9. They were next sighted Nov. 22 in Washington County, Indiana—on migration! They were using the shallow edge of a lake and foraging in a harvested cornfield next to the lake. They roosted near Hiwassee NWR in TN on Nov. 24. On Nov. 24 they were in Sumter County, GA. On Nov. 30, cranes #401, 407, and 408 completed migration when they arrived at the Florida pen site. They soon moved on to other nearby areas.
    Spring 2006: Still with #401 and #407, he left Madison County, Florida, and flew into Georgia on March 9. They completed migration to Wisconsin's Necedah NWR March 20.
Banding:
G/R/G | W/G
412
  • Male
  • Hatched May 9th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 9-days. Received 9 hrs & 5 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC, where he did well with training from the beginning. Can be "a bit of a jerk" every now and the, but mostly is cooperative. Really scared of thunderstorms as a little chick. An insect bite on his face caused much swelling and he had to take medicine for weeks. Even so, his attitude and personality didn't waiver; he never became afraid of the costume, and continued as the best flyer and follower in cohort 2, the middle group in age.
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1. Was crated to the next stop on day 22. On day 48, he dropped away just 10 miles from the destination. By himself, he flew 80 miles south, then 80 miles north, landing 8 miles east of the morning's departure site at the Hiwassee State Wildlife Refuge!
  • History: Spring 2005: Stayed behind at the pen site when 11 flock mates left on migration 25 March. Began migration along with #204 and #105 on March 30. On April 3, the trio flew 13 hours, the final 3 hours in darkness, with #412 seeming in the lead. (Like Day 48 of the journey south!?) After those two older cranes left him on April 5, he joined up with older cranes #304 and #311 in flight over Indiana. The trio arrived in Wisconsin on or about April 6. They left their roost site in Sauk County, WI on April 7th and completed migration with a short flight to Necedah National Wildlife Refuge that afternoon. Crane 412 was the FIRST 2004 chick to officially arrive back at Necedah NWR! He separated from the two older birds and roosted that night very close to the training sites where he had "flight lessons," but for most of the summer, cranes #402, 403, 412, 416, and 417 roosted as a group, often with sandhill cranes. They spent time in Columbia and Marquette Counties, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #402, 403, 416, and 417. They made it to Indiana the first day. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. According to tracker Lara Fondow, the five males landed at their former pen site in Florida at 2:05 November 17. They are the first Eastern flock whoopers to complete migration to the primary wintering area in west-central Florida this fall! With no free food at the pen, they wandered north the next day.
    Spring 2006: Began migration on March 27 or 28 in a group with 402, 412, 416 and 417. They were reported in Dane County, WI on March 31. They moved up to Necedah NWR to complete their migration on April 6!
Banding:
G/W/R | W/G
414
  • Male
  • Hatched May 14th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 9 days of age. Received 7 hrs & 37 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. He's had an odd gait from the beginning, and limps when speeding, but tries hard to keep up. Stubborn! He was a problem flyer who kept turning back or dropping out during training. Pilots left him all alone for 2 nights after his cohort 2 moved to cohort 3's site. After that, he willingly followed the ultralight over to join his flock mates. On Sept. 15, he flew a training session with the "two little girls" (#419 & 420). He liked flying with them so much that he stopped dropping out! Kind of an underdog. Dropped out and crated to the next stopover on day 15, along with 419 and 420.
  • First Migration South: A very good bird, along with 419 and 420.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4.  On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #408 stayed with 401, 407 and 408. They returned to their previous roost in Fond du Lac County, WI and were gone when the site was checked on April 7.  They were next seen April 14 during an aerial search in Winnebago County, Illinois, in a harvested cornfield 1 mile south of the Wisconsin border. They roosted at this location and foraged in cornfields on both sides of the Illinois-Wisconsin state line until 25 April when they proceeded northward to roost in Adams County, WI---27 miles from Necedah NWR. 
    On April 27 they completed migration to Necedah NWR, then flew to nearby Yellow River Cranberry, just east of the Refuge. On May 10 the remains of yearling #414 were found below the south reservoir of Yellow River Cranberry, Juneau County. He had apparently been roosting with #401, #407 and #408 in a small pool surrounded by vegetative cover on the night of May 2. He is believed to have been killed by a large predator there during that night.
Banding:
R/W/R | W/G
415
  • Female
  • Hatched May 16th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 7-days. Received 7 hrs & 27 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. Gets along great with #414 and seems dedicated to the aircraft. Scared of thunderstorms as a little chick. She was the only female in cohort 2. Submissive, but always a great flyer and follower. She sometimes acts the same way with treats that #406 does. She seems too nervous to take them from the puppet, but quickly gobbles them up if they are dropped on the ground.
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #415 stayed with 2, 3, 16, 17, 19 and 20 in Dane County, WI. They all finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3. She spent much time with sandhill cranes on or in nearby farm fields in Dane County, WI during the summer and fall.
    Fall 2005: She was not found in her usual area on Nov. 17, a day when at least 18 whoopers began migration from the area. She was confirmed that night at Jasper-Pulaski SWA in Indiana! She roosted at Hiwassee NWR in TN on Nov. 24 and left on Nov. 25. She passed 3 male flock mates #401, 407 and 408 and roosted at a Georgia location farther south. She was in Madison County, FL on Nov. 26. She moved around, but remained in Madison County locations.
    Spring 2006: Began migration on March 25. PTT readings showed she roosted that night in Dooly County, Georgia; on March 26 in Gordon County, Georgia. She crossed Indiana the next 3 days, and completed migration on March 30!
Banding:
R/G | W/G
416
  • Male
  • Hatched May 17th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 8-days. Received 2 hrs & 57 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. Missed many days of training at Patuxent due to respiratory infection, bowed hocks, and then a broken toe or foot from being stepped on). A cast was applied and he missed taxi-training until the toe healed. Mark said, "The little guy still trucked right along with all the rest of them." Cast was removed mid-July at Necedah. Now Follows well. Good flyer and "just another great bird."
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Stilll together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #416 stayed with 2, 3, 15, 17, 19 and 20 in Dane County, WI and they all finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3. During the summer, cranes #402, 403, 412, 416, and 417 roosted as a group, often with sandhill cranes. They spent time in Columbia and Marquette Counties, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #402, 403, 412, and 417. They made it to Indiana the first day. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. According to tracker Lara Fondow, the five males landed at their former pen site in Florida at 2:05 November 17. They are the first Eastern flock whoopers to complete migration to the primary wintering area in west-central Florida this fall! With no free food at the pen, they wandered north the next day.
    Spring 2006: Began migration on March 27 or 28 in a group with 402, 412, 403 and 417. They were reported in Dane County, WI on March 31. They moved up to Necedah NWR to complete their migration on April 6!
Banding:
W/G/R | W/G
417
  • Male
  • Hatched May 17th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 9-days. Received 6 hrs & 32 min. of aircraft conditioning while at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Was not scared of thunderstorms like other chicks, but was reluctant to follow aircraft on training flights. Swamp Monster used Aug. 19/20 to encourage him. He improved and soon flew 30-minute excursions with the ultralight! Gets along great with #418. Follows the plane well.
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4.  On April 6 the group of 11 split. Chick #417 stayed with 2, 3, 15, 16, 19 and 20 in Dane County, WI and they all finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3. During the summer, cranes #402, 403, 412, 416, and 417 roosted as a group, often with sandhill cranes. They spent time in Columbia and Marquette Counties, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #402, 403, 412, and 416. They made it to Indiana the first day.On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. On November 10th they were roosting at a central Tennessee location. According to tracker Lara Fondow, the five males landed at their former pen site in Florida at 2:05 November 17. They are the first Eastern flock whoopers to complete migration to the primary wintering area in west-central Florida this fall! With no free food at the pen, they wandered north the next day.
    Spring 2006: Began migration on March 27 or 28 in a group with 402, 412, 403 and 416. They were reported in Dane County, WI on March 31. They moved up to Necedah NWR to complete their migration on April 6!
    The remains of #417 were found on Wisconsin's N Gallagher Flowage, Sandhill SWA, on June 18, 2006. The mortality site contained no standing water. Predation is suspected, as tooth marks are the legs are consistent with those of a coyote.
Banding:
R/G/R | W/G
418
  • Male
  • Hatched May 19th
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 8-days. Received 6 hrs & 30 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent. Gets along great with #417. Follows the plane well, but is a runt and bully! Likes mealworms so much that he chases off the older, larger chicks to get the worms. Once got beat up by #412 for biting its wing hard. Primary feathers began falling out early in August. Traveled in a crate (he couldn't fly without primary feathers) to join flock mates when cohorts 2 and 3 joined together on Sept. 3. Doctors hope a new set will grow in so #418 can continue flight training and be included in fall migration. It didn't happen. He also showed less interest in the costume and ultralight--a worrisome situation. The team decided just before migration that this chick, who has plenty of confidence and spunk but could not complete the necessary ultralight conditioning, will not migrate with flock mates. Instead he will be left behind in hopes that he'll join up with some experienced ultra-whoopers on the refuge and follow them to Florida, thus learning the route. This has worked with sandhill cranes. Will the older ultra-whoopers accept him, or will they drive him off or battle him?
  • First Migration South: One of the seven who flew on day 1.
  • History: Spring 2005: On November 7 he left on migration with yearling #307, an older crane who knows the way. The two landed to roost in west-central Indiana. Unfortunately, #307 then took off again. The next day the airborne tracking team followed #418's signal and saw him flying in a flock of Sandhill cranes. Then they also noticed another whooping crane in the flock! Unable to detect any other radio signals, they concluded that his travel mate was the only crane among the 35 wild birds that is not trackable because of a dead battery in her transmitter. It's the elusive female #107 from the very first ultralight-led migration!  But as roost time neared, #418 landed along the Cumberland River in Tennessee, while #107 kept going. Both stayed at their chosen locations on Nov. 9th due to poor migration conditions. On Nov. 10 at 9:45 a.m., #418 lifted off with a flock of sandhill cranes. They arrived in early afternoon at the Hiwassee State Wildlife Refuge in Meigs County, TN. Later in the day #418 foraged within 1/4 mile of females #107 AND #201. He shouldn't have any trouble locating others of his kind; including him, SEVEN of the Eastern flock's glowing white whooping cranes are now at this crane-friendly refuge in Tennessee-- halfway to Florida. He was still at Hiwassee with 4 older ultracranes when this year's chicks completed their migration on Dec. 12. He resumed migration from Hiwassee with #205 on December 19th. About January 3 they finally settled in Pasco County, FL near where #205 spent last winter. They are on a ranch where ultra-cranes #211, 212 and 217 are wintering.
    In fall 2005, #418 was the first crane in the eastern migratory flock to successfully complete fall migration to Florida by following older whooping Cranes.
    Spring 2005: This young male was left alone after #205, an older male he had been hanging out with over the winter, departed on migration from their Pasco County, FL wintering site sometime between March 9 - 12. Crane #418 was then either alone or with single or paired non migratory sandhill cranes. He likely began migration on April 18 as PTT data on April 19 put him in Forsyth Co., GA. PTT readings put him in Scott County, Indiana on the nights of April 22-27. He moved to Fulton County, IN on April 28. He stayed there until May 8 when he flew to Cook County, IL. On May 10, he left a stop in metro-Chicago (Cook County, IL) and migrated to Washington County, WISCONSIN! Left Dodge County and arrived Necedah NWR May 16. Migration complete! On June 14, he joined females #419 and #420.
    On July 16, 2005, his remains were found by tracker Lara Fondow under an electrical transmission line in a cornfield in central Wisconsin. His death, caused by collision with the power line, likely happened between July 1 - 11--a sad ending for a brave pioneer.
 
Banding:
R/W | W/G
419
  • Female
  • Hatched May 29th
  • Origin: ICF
  • Personality Characteristics: Introduced to the trike at 9 days. Had 8 hrs & 10 min. aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. The "2 little girls," 419 and 420, got airborne for their first short flight August 19. After all cohorts were blended on Sep. 20, she showed that she hates #403 by taking every opportunity to go over and give him a beak jab. By the end of September the "2 little girls" could fly 36 minutes at 500 feet altitude! She has real ATTITUDE for her small size, and is "the little girl you don't wanna mess with." Only the biggest males stand up to her, and she is probably in the top 3 or 5 birds in the social order! Stubborn,independent. This little gal is a daughter of Gee Whiz!
  • First Migration South:Dropped out and crated to the next stop on days 15 and 22. But the two little girls did well; when they tired and dropped back, another ultralight swooped in to fly with them. They often had their own plane and got help from the currents off the ultralight's wing. A very good bird, along with 414 and 420.
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. On April 6 the group  of 11 separated. Chick #419 stayed with 2, 3, 15, 16, 17 and 20 in Dane County, WI and they all finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3.  During the summer she was often with sandhill cranes and #420 in farmlands of Columbia County, WI. and a marsh with sandhill cranes in Marquette County, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #420. They made it to Indiana the first day. They reached Madison County, Florida on Nov. 15--the FIRST of their cohort to reach Florida without the ultralight to lead them! They stayed the winter in Madison County, FL.    
    Spring 2006: Began migration with #420 on March 28. PTT readings for that night were from Butts County, Georgia and on March 29 in Tennessee. By March 31, they had arrived at the same spot where #319 and #520 were located, and stayed at least through April 2. The two completed migration to Central Wisconsin on April 8. By April 10 the two birds had separated, and #419 was found with sandhills on a cranberry wetland in Wood County, WI.
Banding:
W/R | W/G
420
  • Female
  • Hatched June 3rd
  • Origin: PWRC
  • Personality Characteristics: The youngest. Introduced to the trike at 9 days. Received 6 hrs & 20 min. of aircraft conditioning while at Patuxent WRC. Small but very determined to follow the trike. The "2 little girls," 419 and 420, got airborne for their first short flight August 19--long after the oldest chicks. By the end of September the "two little girls" could fly 36 minutes at 500 feet altitude! Mark says "#420 is the cutest little sandhill-sized 'pigpen' of a whooper you could ever ask for. Very tiny, and sometimes walks around all hunkered down, making her even smaller. But when she wants to, she struts her stuff with her buddy, #419." See why Mark calls her a little dirtball. Likes to eat field mice and is the first to nab any that happen to be in the fields as soon as the birds land at a new area.
  • First Migration South:The two little girls did well, and when they tired and dropped back, another ultralight swooped in to fly with them. They often had their own plane and got help from the currents off the ultralight's wing. Considered a very good bird, along with 414 and 419 in her "trio."
  • History: Spring 2005: Left on first journey north with the group of 11 on 25 March, 2005 after 103 days on wintering grounds. After flying through Georgia and veering as far east as South Carolina, the flock corrected their course, stopping in Indiana before reaching Wisconsin. Still together, the group of 11 entered Wisconsin the evening of April 4. They continued migration on April 5 but it was cloudy so they landed in Fond du Lac County. On April 6 the group  of 11 separated. Chick #420 stayed with 402, 403, 415, 416, 417 and 419 in Dane County, WI and they all finished their migration to Necedah NWR on May 3. During the summer she was often with sandhill cranes and #419 in farmlands of Columbia County, WI. and a marsh with sandhill cranes in Marquette County, WI.
    Fall 2005: Left Wisconsin on its first unaided fall migration on November 9, together with #419. They made it to Indiana the first day. They reached Madison County, Florida on Nov. 15--the FIRST of their cohort to reach Florida without the ultralight to lead them! They stayed the winter in Madison County, FL.
    Spring 2006: Began migration with #419 on March 28. PTT readings for that night were from Butts County, Georgia and on March 29 in Tennessee. By March 31, they had arrived at the same spot where #319 and #520 were located, and stayed at least through April 2. The two completed migration to Central Wisconsin on April 8. By April 10 the two birds had separated. PTT readings indicated that #420 was in Clark County, WI. According to PTT readings, she was in Chippewa County, Wisconsin, until April 27. She then flew to Aitkin and Mille Lacs Counties, Minnesota. PTT readings indicated that she returned to Chippewa County, Wisconsin, on May 2. She later joined sandhill cranes and remained with them on a lake in Rusk County, WI.
Banding:
G/R | W/G

 

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